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Singulair online purchase

A fourth wave of the opioid epidemic is singulair online purchase coming, a national expert on drug use and policy said during a virtual panel discussion this week hosted by the Berkshire County, Massachusetts, District Attorney’s Office and the Berkshire Opioid Addiction Prevention Collaborative.Dr. Daniel Ciccarone, a professor of family and community medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Medicine, said the next wave in the country’s opioid health emergency will focus on stimulants like methamphetamine and cocaine, and drug combinations where stimulants are used in conjunction with opioids.“The use of methamphetamines is back and it’s back big time,” said Ciccarone, whose most recent research has focused on heroin use.Previously, officials had said there were three waves of the opioid epidemic – the first being prescription pills, the second being heroin, and the third being synthetic drugs, like fentanyl.Now, Ciccarone said, what federal law enforcement and medical experts are singulair online purchase seeing is an increase in the use of stimulants, especially methamphetamines.The increase in deaths due to stimulants may be attributed to a number of causes. The increase in supply, both imported and domestically produced, as well as the increase of the drugs’ potency.“Meth’s purity and potency has gone up to historical levels,” he said. €œAs of 2018, singulair online purchase we’ve reached unseen heights of 97 percent potency and 97 percent purity.

In a prohibitionist world, we should not be seeing such high quality. This is almost pharmaceutical quality.”Additionally, law enforcement and public health experts like Ciccarone are seeing an increase in the co-use singulair online purchase of stimulants with opioids, he said. Speedballs, cocaine mixed with heroin, and goofballs, methamphetamines used with heroin or fentanyl, are becoming more common from the Midwest into Appalachia and up through New England, he said.Federal law enforcement officials are recommending local communities prepare for the oncoming rise in illegal drugs coming into their communities.“Some people will use them both at the same time, but some may use them in some combination regularly,” he said. €œThey may use meth in the morning to go to work, and use heroin at night to come down.”The co-use, he said, was an singulair online purchase organic response to the fentanyl overdose epidemic.“Some of the things that we heard … is that meth is popularly construed as helping to decrease heroin and fentanyl use.

Helping with heroin withdraw symptoms and helping with heroin overdoses,” he said. €œWe debated this for many years that people were using stimulants to reverse overdoses – singulair online purchase we’re hearing it again.”“Supply is up, purity is up, price is down,” he said. €œWe know from economics that when drug patterns go in that direction, use is going up.”Ciccarone said that there should not be deaths because of stimulants, but that heroin/fentanyl is the deadly element in the equation.His recommendations to communities were not to panic, but to lower the stigma surrounding drug use in order to affect change. Additionally, he said, policies should singulair online purchase focus on reduction.

supply reduction, demand reduction and harm reduction. But not focus on only one single drug.Additionally, he said that by addressing issues within communities and by healing communities socially, economically and spiritually, communities can begin to reduce demand.“We’ve got to fix the cracks in our singulair online purchase society, because drugs fall into the cracks,” he said.Shutterstock U.S. Rep. Annie Kuster (D-NH) recently held two virtual roundtables addressing how COVID-19 has affected New Hampshire’s healthcare industry.“The singulair online purchase health and economic crisis caused by COVID-19 has created significant challenges for Granite State healthcare, mental health, and substance use treatment providers — at the same time, we are seeing increases in substance abuse and mental illness across New Hampshire,” Kuster said.

€œFrom the transition to telehealth singulair online purchase care and cancellations of elective procedures to a lack of personal protective equipment and increasing health needs of our communities – providers have overcome a multitude of obstacles due to COVID-19 in recent months. I was glad to hear from these hard-working Granite Staters, whose insights will continue to guide my work in Congress as we respond to this pandemic. I’m committed to ensuring that communities across New Hampshire can safely access the care and treatment they deserve.”The first roundtable addressed substance-use disorder (SUD) singulair online purchase and mental health.The second virtual roundtable was an opportunity for health care providers to speak about their workplace challenges during the pandemic. Kuster is the founder and co-chairwoman of the Bipartisan Opioid Task Force, which held a virtual discussion in June on the opioid crisis and the pandemic.Shutterstock Opioid prescription rates for outpatient knee surgery vary nationwide, according to a study recently published in BMJ Open.

€œWe found massive levels of variation in the proportion of patients who are prescribed opioids between states, singulair online purchase even after adjusting for nuances of the procedure and differences in patient characteristics,” said Dr. M. Kit Delgado, the study’s senior author and an assistant professor of Emergency Medicine and Epidemiology in the Perelman singulair online purchase School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. €œWe’ve also seen that the average number of pills prescribed was extremely high for outpatient procedures of this type, particularly for patients who had not been taking opioids prior to surgery.”Researchers examined insurance claims for nearly 100,000 patients who had arthroscopic knee surgery between 2015 and 2019 and had not used any opioid prescriptions in the six months before the surgery.Within three days of a procedure, 72 percent of patients filled an opioid prescription.

High prescription rates were singulair online purchase found in the Midwest and the Rocky Mountain regions. The coasts had lower rates.Nationwide, the average prescription strength was equivalent to 250 milligrams of morphine over five days. This is the threshold for increased singulair online purchase risk of opioid overdose death, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.Shutterstock U.S. Secretary of Labor Eugene Scalia awarded nearly $20 million to four states significantly impacted by the opioid crisis, the Department of Labor announced Thursday.

The Florida singulair online purchase Department of Economic Opportunity, the Maryland Department of Labor, the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, and the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development were awarded the money as part of the DOL’s “Support to Communities. Fostering Opioid Recovery through Workforce Development” created after the passage of the SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act of 2018. The money will be used to retrain workers in areas with high singulair online purchase rates of substance use disorders. At a press conference in Piketon, Ohio, Scalia said the DOL had awarded Ohio’s Department of Job and Family Services $5 million singulair online purchase to help communities in southern Ohio combat the opioid crisis in that area.

€œToday’s funding represents this Administration’s continued commitment to serving those most in need,” said Assistant Secretary for Employment and Training John Pallasch. €œThe U.S singulair online purchase. Department of Labor is taking a strong stand to support individuals and communities impacted by the crisis.”Grantees will use the funds to collaborate with community partners, such as employers, local workforce development boards, treatment and recovery centers, law enforcement officials, faith-based community organizations, and others, to address the economic effects of substance misuse, opioid use, addiction, and overdose.Shutterstock CVS Health has completed the installation of time-delayed safe technology at all 446 Massachusetts locations as part of its initiatives aimed at reducing the misuse and diversion of prescription medications in Massachusetts, the company announced Thursday. The safes are intended to prevent robberies of singulair online purchase controlled substance medications, such as oxycodone and hydrocodone, by electronically delaying the time it takes for pharmacy employees to open the safe where those drugs are stored.The company also announced that it had added 50 new medication disposal units in select stores throughout Massachusetts.

Those units join 106 secure disposal units previously installed at CVS locations across the state and another 43 units previously donated to Massachusetts law enforcement agencies. The company plans singulair online purchase to install another six units in stores by the year’s end. €œWhile our nation and our company focus on COVID-19 treatment, testing, and other measures to prevent community transmission of the virus, the misuse of prescription drugs remains an ongoing challenge in Massachusetts and elsewhere that warrants our continued attention,” said John Hering, Region Director for CVS Health. €œThese steps to reduce the theft and diversion of opioid medications bring added security to our stores and more disposal options for our singulair online purchase communities.”In 2015, CVS implemented time-delayed safe technology in CVS pharmacies across Indianapolis in response to the high volume of pharmacy robberies in that city.

The company saw a 70 percent decline in pharmacy robberies in stores where the time-delayed safes were installed. Since then, the company has installed 4,760 time-delayed safes in 15 states and the District of Columbia and singulair online purchase has seen a 50 percent decline in pharmacy robberies in those areas. The company said it would add an additional 1,000 in-store medication disposal units to the 2,500 units it currently has in CVS pharmacies nationwide. The units allow customers to drop unused prescriptions into a safe place for their disposal to prevent those drugs from being misused.

CVS stores that do not offer medication disposal units offer all customers filling opioid prescriptions for the first time with DisposeRX packets that effectively and efficiently breakdown unused drugs into a biodegradable gel for safe disposal in the trash at home..

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REDWOOD CITY, Calif.--(BUSINESS generic for singulair tablet WIRE)--Oct. 16, 2020-- Guardant Health, Inc. (Nasdaq. GH) today announced it will report financial results for the third quarter 2020 after market close on Thursday, November 5, 2020.

Company management will be webcasting a corresponding conference call beginning at 1:30 p.m. Pacific Time / 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time. Live audio of the webcast will be available on the “Investors” section of the company website at.

Www.guardanthealth.com. The webcast will be archived and available for replay after the event. About Guardant Health Guardant Health is a leading precision oncology company focused on helping conquer cancer globally through use of its proprietary blood tests, vast data sets and advanced analytics. The Guardant Health Oncology Platform leverages capabilities to drive commercial adoption, improve patient clinical outcomes and lower healthcare costs across all stages of the cancer care continuum.

Guardant Health has launched liquid biopsy-based Guardant360®, Guardant360 CDx, and GuardantOMNI® tests for advanced stage cancer patients. These tests fuel development of its LUNAR program, which aims to address the needs of early stage cancer patients with neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment selection, cancer survivors with surveillance, asymptomatic individuals eligible for cancer screening and individuals at a higher risk for developing cancer with early detection. View source version on businesswire.com. Https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201016005576/en/ Investor Contact.

Carrie Mendivilinvestors@guardanthealth.com Media Contact. Anna Czenepress@guardanthealth.com Courtney Carrollcourtney.carroll@uncappedcommunications.com Source. Guardant Health, Inc.REDWOOD CITY, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Oct. 15, 2020-- Guardant Health, Inc.

(Nasdaq. GH) (“Guardant Health”), a leading precision oncology company focused on helping conquer cancer globally through use of its proprietary blood tests, vast data sets and advanced analytics, announced today the closings of an underwritten public offering of 7,700,000 shares of its common stock, which includes full exercise of the underwriter’s option to purchase 700,000 shares, at a public offering price of $102.00 per share, before deducting underwriting discounts and commissions, all of which were sold by SoftBank Investment Advisers. The initial closing of 7,000,000 shares occurred on October 9, 2020, and the closing of the underwriter’s option to purchase additional shares occurred today. Guardant Health did not sell any of its shares in the offering and did not receive any of the proceeds from the sale of shares in the offering by SoftBank Investment Advisers.

J.P. Morgan Securities LLC acted as sole book-running manager of the offering. The public offering was made pursuant to an automatic shelf registration statement on Form S-3 that was filed by Guardant Health with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) and automatically became effective upon filing.

A final prospectus supplement and accompanying prospectus relating to and describing the terms of the offering have been filed with the SEC and are available on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov. Copies of the final prospectus supplement and accompanying prospectus may be obtained by contacting. J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, c/o Broadridge Financial Solutions, 1155 Long Island Avenue, Edgewood, NY 11717, or by telephone at (866) 803-9204, or by email at prospectus-eq_fi@jpmchase.com.

This press release shall not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy these securities, nor shall there be any sale of these securities in any state or other jurisdiction in which such offer, solicitation or sale would be unlawful prior to the registration or qualification under the securities laws of any such state or other jurisdiction. Source. Guardant Health, Inc. View source version on businesswire.com.

Https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201015005933/en/ Investors. Carrie Mendivilinvestors@guardanthealth.com Media. Anna Czenepress@guardanthealth.comSource. Guardant Health, Inc..

REDWOOD CITY, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Oct singulair online purchase. 16, 2020-- Guardant Health, Inc. (Nasdaq.

GH) today announced it will report financial results for the third quarter 2020 after market close on Thursday, November 5, 2020. Company management will be webcasting a corresponding conference call beginning at 1:30 p.m. Pacific Time / 4:30 p.m.

Eastern Time. Live audio of the webcast will be available on the “Investors” section of the company website at. Www.guardanthealth.com.

The webcast will be archived and available for replay after the event. About Guardant Health Guardant Health is a leading precision oncology company focused on helping conquer cancer globally through use of its proprietary blood tests, vast data sets and advanced analytics. The Guardant Health Oncology Platform leverages capabilities to drive commercial adoption, improve patient clinical outcomes and lower healthcare costs across all stages of the cancer care continuum.

Guardant Health has launched liquid biopsy-based Guardant360®, Guardant360 CDx, and GuardantOMNI® tests for advanced stage cancer patients. These tests fuel development of its LUNAR program, which aims to address the needs of early stage cancer patients with neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment selection, cancer survivors with surveillance, asymptomatic individuals eligible for cancer screening and individuals at a higher risk for developing cancer with early detection. View source version on businesswire.com.

Https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201016005576/en/ Investor Contact. Carrie Mendivilinvestors@guardanthealth.com Media Contact. Anna Czenepress@guardanthealth.com Courtney Carrollcourtney.carroll@uncappedcommunications.com Source.

Guardant Health, Inc.REDWOOD CITY, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Oct. 15, 2020-- Guardant Health, Inc. (Nasdaq.

GH) (“Guardant Health”), a leading precision oncology company focused on helping conquer cancer globally through use of its proprietary blood tests, vast data sets and advanced analytics, announced today the closings of an underwritten public offering of 7,700,000 shares of its common stock, which includes full exercise of the underwriter’s option to purchase 700,000 shares, at a public offering price of $102.00 per share, before deducting underwriting discounts and commissions, all of which were sold by SoftBank Investment Advisers. The initial closing of 7,000,000 shares occurred on October 9, 2020, and the closing of the underwriter’s option to purchase additional shares occurred today. Guardant Health did not sell any of its shares in the offering and did not receive any of the proceeds from the sale of shares in the offering by SoftBank Investment Advisers.

J.P. Morgan Securities LLC acted as sole book-running manager of the offering. The public offering was made pursuant to an automatic shelf registration statement on Form S-3 that was filed by Guardant Health with the U.S.

Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) and automatically became effective upon filing. A final prospectus supplement and accompanying prospectus relating to and describing the terms of the offering have been filed with the SEC and are available on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov. Copies of the final prospectus supplement and accompanying prospectus may be obtained by contacting.

J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, c/o Broadridge Financial Solutions, 1155 Long Island Avenue, Edgewood, NY 11717, or by telephone at (866) 803-9204, or by email at prospectus-eq_fi@jpmchase.com. This press release shall not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy these securities, nor shall there be any sale of these securities in any state or other jurisdiction in which such offer, solicitation or sale would be unlawful prior to the registration or qualification under the securities laws of any such state or other jurisdiction.

Source. Guardant Health, Inc. View source version on businesswire.com.

Https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201015005933/en/ Investors. Carrie Mendivilinvestors@guardanthealth.com Media. Anna Czenepress@guardanthealth.comSource.

What may interact with Singulair?

  • carbamazepine
  • paclitaxel
  • phenobarbital
  • phenytoin
  • repaglinide
  • rifabutin
  • rifampin
  • rosiglitazone

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

Can you take singulair and flonase at the same time

€‚For the podcast associated with this can you take singulair and flonase at the same time article, please visit https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/pages/Podcasts. First scienceThe COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world and has refocused science, including cardiovascular (CV) research.1 This virus not only affects the throat and lungs, but also profoundly impacts the CV system. First of all, male sex, obesity, hypertension,2 diabetes and cardiac conditions at large increased the risk can you take singulair and flonase at the same time of infection, possibly related to angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) expression,3,4 and of an unfavourable disease course.

Secondly, COVID-19 affects the heart, leading to myocarditis,5,6 myocardial injury,7 scar formation and arrhythmias, and heart block,8 as well as affecting the blood vessels, leading to vascular occlusion due to local thrombus formation or embolism and eventually cardiac death.9 The mechanisms involved are the usual suspects, as outlined in the Viewpoint ‘COVID-19 is, in the end, an endothelial disease’, by Peter Libby from the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, USA and myself. It is well known that the vascular endothelium provides the crucial interface between the circulating blood and tissues, and displays remarkable properties that normally maintain can you take singulair and flonase at the same time homeostasis.10 This tightly regulated array of functions includes control of haemostasis, fibrinolysis, inflammation, oxidative stress, vascular permeability, and eventually vasomotion and vascular structure. While these functions participate in the moment to moment regulation of the circulation and coordinate many host defence mechanisms, they can also contribute to disease when their usually homeostatic and defensive functions overreach and turn against the host, as is the case with SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing the current pandemic (Figure 1).

Figure 1Cytokine can you take singulair and flonase at the same time storm. Proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1 and TNF-α induce each other’s gene expression, unleashing an amplification loop that sustains the cytokine storm. The endothelial cell is a key target of cytokines, as they induce action of a central proinflammatory transcriptional hub, nuclear factor-κB.

IL-1 also cause substantial increases in production by endothelial and other cells of IL-6, the instigator of the can you take singulair and flonase at the same time hepatocyte acute phase response. The acute phase reactants include fibrinogen, the precursor of clot, and PAI-1, the major inhibitor of our endogenous fibrinolytic system. C-reactive protein, commonly elevated in COVID-19, provides a readily measured biomarker can you take singulair and flonase at the same time of inflammatory status.

The alterations in the thrombotic/fibrinolytic balance due to the acute phase response predisposes towards thrombosis in arteries, in the microvasculature including that of organs such as the myocardium and kidney, and in veins, causing deep vein thrombosis and predisposing towards pulmonary embolism. Thus, the very same cytokines that elicit abnormal endothelial functions can unleash the acute phase response can you take singulair and flonase at the same time which together with local endothelial dysfunction can conspire to cause the clinical complications of COVID-19. The right side of this diagram aligns therapeutic agents that attack these mechanisms of the cytokine storm and may thus limit its devastating consequences (from Libby P, Lüscher T.

COVID-19 is, in the end, an endothelial disease. See pages 3038–3044).Figure 1Cytokine can you take singulair and flonase at the same time storm. Proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1 and TNF-α induce each other’s gene expression, unleashing an amplification loop that sustains the cytokine storm.

The endothelial cell is a key target of cytokines, as they induce action of a central proinflammatory transcriptional hub, can you take singulair and flonase at the same time nuclear factor-κB. IL-1 also cause substantial increases in production by endothelial and other cells of IL-6, the instigator of the hepatocyte acute phase response. The acute can you take singulair and flonase at the same time phase reactants include fibrinogen, the precursor of clot, and PAI-1, the major inhibitor of our endogenous fibrinolytic system.

C-reactive protein, commonly elevated in COVID-19, provides a readily measured biomarker of inflammatory status. The alterations in the thrombotic/fibrinolytic balance due to the acute phase response predisposes towards thrombosis in arteries, in the microvasculature including that of organs such as the myocardium and kidney, and in veins, causing deep vein thrombosis and predisposing towards pulmonary embolism. Thus, the very same cytokines can you take singulair and flonase at the same time that elicit abnormal endothelial functions can unleash the acute phase response which together with local endothelial dysfunction can conspire to cause the clinical complications of COVID-19.

The right side of this diagram aligns therapeutic agents that attack these mechanisms of the cytokine storm and may thus limit its devastating consequences (from Libby P, Lüscher T. COVID-19 is, in the end, can you take singulair and flonase at the same time an endothelial disease. See pages 3038–3044).It produces protean manifestations ranging from head to toe, wreaking seemingly indiscriminate havoc on multiple organ systems including the lungs, heart, brain, kidney, and the vasculature.

This Viewpoint presents the hypothesis that COVID-19, particularly in the later complicated stages, represents can you take singulair and flonase at the same time an endothelial disease. Cytokines, protein proinflammatory mediators, are key signals that shift endothelial function from the homeostatic into the defensive mode. The endgame of COVID-19 involves a cytokine storm with positive feedback loops governing cytokine can you take singulair and flonase at the same time production that overwhelm counter-regulatory mechanisms.

This concept provides a unifying concept of this raging infection and a framework for rational treatment strategies at a time when we possess an only modest evidence base to guide our therapeutic attempts to confront this novel pandemic.11Surprisingly, emergency unit visits for acute cardiac conditions have declined markedly.12 Several reasons have been suggested. First, patients may have been wary of visiting hospitals during the pandemic.12,13 Secondly, with life on standstill, plaque ruptures and aortic dissections may have become less likely, and, thirdly, the marked reduction in pollution may also have had an influence.14 The first hypothesis is supported by the Fast Track manuscript ‘COVID-19 kills at home. The close relationship between the epidemic and the increase of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests’ by Simone Savastano and colleagues from the Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo in Italy.15 They included all consecutive out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) occurring can you take singulair and flonase at the same time in the Provinces of Lodi, Cremona, Pavia, and Mantova in the 2 months following the first documented case of COVID-19 in Lombardia compared with those that occurred in the same time window in 2019.

The cumulative incidence of COVID-19 from 21 February to 20 April 2020 was 956/100 000 inhabitants and the cumulative incidence of OHCA was 21/100 000 inhabitants, with a 52% increase as compared with 2019 (Figure 2). A significant correlation was found between the difference in cumulative incidence of OHCA can you take singulair and flonase at the same time and the cumulative incidence of COVID-19. Thus, the OHCA excess in 2020 is closely correlated to the COVID-19 pandemic.

These findings are important for furthering the understanding of the reduced emergency unit visits and for planning of future pandemics, as outlined in an Editorial by Hanno Tan from the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.16 Figure 2(A) Over a period of 60 days from 20 February, the cumulative incidence of COVID-19 per 100 can you take singulair and flonase at the same time 000 inhabitants in the four provinces and in the overall territory (dotted line) (upper part), and the trend of the difference of OHCA between 2020 and 2019 per 100 000 inhabitants in the four provinces and in the overall territory (dotted line) (bottom part). (B) The cumulative incidence of the difference in OHCA between 2020 and 2019 per 100 000 inhabitants as a function of the cumulative incidence of COVID-19 per 100 000 inhabitants, since 20 February 2020. Dots are the observed values.

The red line is the function fitted using can you take singulair and flonase at the same time fractional polynomials. The shaded area is the 95% CI for the estimates (from Baldi E, Maria Sechi G, Mare C, Canevari F, Brancaglione A, Primi R, Klersy C, Palo A, Contri E, Ronchi V, Beretta G, Reali F, Parogni P, Facchin F, Rizzi U, Bussi D, Ruggeri S, Visconti LO, Savastano S, on behalf of the Lombardia CARe researchers. COVID-19 kills can you take singulair and flonase at the same time at home.

The close relationship between the epidemic and the increase of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. See pages 3045–3054).Figure 2(A) Over a period of 60 can you take singulair and flonase at the same time days from 20 February, the cumulative incidence of COVID-19 per 100 000 inhabitants in the four provinces and in the overall territory (dotted line) (upper part), and the trend of the difference of OHCA between 2020 and 2019 per 100 000 inhabitants in the four provinces and in the overall territory (dotted line) (bottom part). (B) The cumulative incidence of the difference in OHCA between 2020 and 2019 per 100 000 inhabitants as a function of the cumulative incidence of COVID-19 per 100 000 inhabitants, since 20 February 2020.

Dots are the observed values. The red can you take singulair and flonase at the same time line is the function fitted using fractional polynomials. The shaded area is the 95% CI for the estimates (from Baldi E, Maria Sechi G, Mare C, Canevari F, Brancaglione A, Primi R, Klersy C, Palo A, Contri E, Ronchi V, Beretta G, Reali F, Parogni P, Facchin F, Rizzi U, Bussi D, Ruggeri S, Visconti LO, Savastano S, on behalf of the Lombardia CARe researchers.

COVID-19 kills can you take singulair and flonase at the same time at home. The close relationship between the epidemic and the increase of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. See pages 3045–3054).With a prothrombotic state of the endothelium, thrombo-embolism should increase can you take singulair and flonase at the same time during the COVID-19 pandemic.17 This hypothesis is pursued in a Fast Track entitled ‘Pulmonary embolism in COVID-19 patients.

A French multicentre cohort study’ by Ariel Cohen from the Hopital Saint-Antoine in Paris, France.18 In a retrospective multicentric observational study, the authors included consecutive patients hospitalized for COVID-19. Among 1527 patients, 6.7% patients had pulmonary embolism confirmed by computed tomographty pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Intensive care unit (ICU) transfer and mechanical ventilation were significantly higher in the pulmonary embolism can you take singulair and flonase at the same time group.

In a univariable analysis, traditional venous thrombo-embolic risk factors and pulmonary lesion extension in chest CT were not associated with pulmonary embolism, while patients under anticoagulation prior to hospitalization or in whom it was introduced during hospitalization had a lower risk of pulmonary embolism, with an odds ratio of 0.37. Male gender, prophylactic or therapeutic anticoagulation, C-reactive protein, and time from symptom onset to hospitalization were associated with pulmonary can you take singulair and flonase at the same time embolism. Thus, risk factors for pulmonary embolism in COVID-19 do not include traditional thrombo-embolic risk factors, but rather independent clinical and biological findings at admission.

In line with can you take singulair and flonase at the same time the concept outlined above, inflammation is a major driver of pulmonary embolism in COVID-19, as further discussed in a thought-provoking Editorial by Adam Torbicki from the Centre of Postgraduate Medical Education in Otwock, Poland.19Inflammation is also a trigger for atrial fibrillation as it changes the electrical properties of the atrial myocardium and eventually favours tissue fibrosis.20 Furthermore, inflammation may trigger tissue factor expression in the atrial endothelium and favour thrombus formation.21 On the other hand, life on standstill may reduce sympathetic drive and hence reduce the likelihood of new-onset atrial fibrillation.22 In their article entitled ‘New-onset atrial fibrillation. Incidence, characteristics, and related events following a national COVID-19 lockdown of 5.6 million people’, Anders Holt and colleagues from the Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev and Gentofte in Hellerup, Denmark resolved this conundrum.23 During 3 weeks of lockdown, weekly incidence rates of new-onset AF were 2.3, 1.8, and 1.5 per 1000 person-years, while during the corresponding weeks in 2019, incidence rates were 3.5, 3.4, and 3.6 per 1000 person-years. Incidence rate ratios comparing the can you take singulair and flonase at the same time same weeks were 0.66, 0.53, and 0.41.

Patients diagnosed during lockdown were younger and had lower CHA2DS2-VASc-scores. During the first 3 weeks of lockdown, 7.8% of patients experienced an ischaemic stroke or death within 7 days of new-onset atrial fibrillation compared with 5.6% during the equivalent weeks in 2019, corresponding to an odds ratio of 1.41. Thus, following a national lockdown in Denmark, new-onset can you take singulair and flonase at the same time atrial fibrillation declined by 47%, while ischaemic stroke or death within 7 days increased.

These complex findings are put into context in an excellent Editorial by Carina Blomstrom-Lundqvist from the Department of Medical Science in Uppsala, Sweden.24Myocardial injury after non-cardiac surgery or MINS is caused by myocardial ischaemia due to a supply–demand mismatch or thrombus and is associated with an increased risk of mortality and major adverse CV events or MACE.25 In their review ‘Myocardial injury after non-cardiac surgery. Diagnosis and management’ Philip Devereaux and colleagues from McMaster can you take singulair and flonase at the same time University in Hamilton, Canada note that the diagnostic criteria for MINS include elevated post-operative troponin levels with no evidence of a non-ischaemic aetiology during or within 30 days after non-cardiac surgery, and without ischaemic features such as chest pain or ECG changes.26 Patients with MINS should receive aspirin and a statin, unless contraindicated, and an NOAC (non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant) if not at high bleeding risk. Cardiac catheterization is only recommended for those with recurrent ischaemia, heart failure, or high risk based on non-invasive imaging.

Troponin should be measured for the first few days after surgery in patients ≥65 years or with atherosclerotic disease to avoid missing MINS and the opportunity for secondary prophylactic measures and follow-up.Finally, the issue is complemented can you take singulair and flonase at the same time by various Discussion Forum contributions on this very timely topic. In a contribution entitled ‘Should atrial fibrillation be considered a cardiovascular risk factor for a worse prognosis in COVID-19 patients?. €™, Fabian Sanchis-Gomar from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Valencia, Spain discuss the recent publication ‘Characteristics and outcomes of patients hospitalized for COVID-19 and cardiac disease in Northern Italy’ by Marco Metra and colleagues from Brescia, Italy.9,27 Metra et al.

Respond in can you take singulair and flonase at the same time turn. In a comment entitled ‘ACE2 is on the X chromosome. Could this can you take singulair and flonase at the same time explain COVID-19 gender differences?.

€™ Felix Hernandez from the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa in Madrid, and his colleague Esther Culebras discuss the recent publication entitled ‘Circulating plasma concentrations of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 in men and women with heart failure and effects of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone inhibitors’ by Adriaan Voors and colleagues from the University Medical Center Groningen in the Netherlands.3,28 Voors et al. Respond in a separate comment.29In a contribution entitled ‘Circulating plasma can you take singulair and flonase at the same time angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 concentrations in patients with kidney disease’, Insa Marie Schmidt and colleagues from the Boston University in Massachusetts, USA also comment on the article by Voors et al.3,30 Voors and colleagues respond in a separate message to this piece.31 Time for the last wordsThis is my last Issue@aGlance in the European Heart Journal in my role of Editor-in-Chief. It has been a pleasure and honour to serve both authors and readers of this fine journal and the European Society of Cardiology over more than a decade.

My goal has always been to make it more attractive and informative for clinicians and important and stimulating for scientists worldwide. I hope you have enjoyed can you take singulair and flonase at the same time it. Needless to say, that was only possible thanks to an amazing team of editors, reviewers, authors, and editorial staff.

I hope that you enjoy this very last issue under my leadership can you take singulair and flonase at the same time. The time has come to hand the European Heart Journal over to the new Editor-in-Chief, Filippo Crea from Rome. I am certain Professor Crea will can you take singulair and flonase at the same time do an excellent job with his new team, retaining some of the experienced editorial staff from Zurich.

Thank you for submitting to, reviewing for, and reading the European Heart Journal, and goodbye—I am sure we will stay in touch.With thanks to Amelia Meier-Batschelet for help with compilation of this article. References1Anker SD, Butler J, Khan MS, Abraham WT, Bauersachs J, Bocchi E, Bozkurt B, Braunwald E, Chopra VK, Cleland JG, Ezekowitz J, Filippatos G, Friede T, Hernandez AF, Lam CSP, Lindenfeld J, McMurray JJV, Mehra M, Metra M, Packer M, Pieske B, Pocock SJ, Ponikowski P, Rosano GMC, Teerlink JR, Tsutsui H, Van Veldhuisen DJ, Verma S, Voors AA, Wittes J, Zannad F, Zhang J, Seferovic P, Coats AJS. Conducting clinical trials in heart failure during (and after) the COVID-19 can you take singulair and flonase at the same time pandemic.

An Expert Consensus Position Paper from the Heart Failure Association (HFA) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Eur Heart J 2020;41:2109–2117.2Gao C, Cai Y, Zhang K, Zhou L, Zhang Y, Zhang X, Li Q, Li W, Yang S, Zhao X, Zhao Y, Wang H, Liu Y, Yin Z, Zhang R, Wang R, Yang M, Hui can you take singulair and flonase at the same time C, Wijns W, McEvoy JW, Soliman O, Onuma Y, Serruys PW, Tao L, Li F. Association of hypertension and antihypertensive treatment with COVID-19 mortality.

A retrospective can you take singulair and flonase at the same time observational study. Eur Heart J 2020;41:2058–2066.3Sama IE, Ravera A, Santema BT, van Goor H, Ter Maaten JM, Cleland JGF, Rienstra M, Friedrich AW, Samani NJ, Ng LL, Dickstein K, Lang CC, Filippatos G, Anker SD, Ponikowski P, Metra M, van Veldhuisen DJ, Voors AA. Circulating plasma concentrations of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 in men and women with heart failure and effects of can you take singulair and flonase at the same time renin–angiotensin–aldosterone inhibitors.

Eur Heart J 2020;41:1810–1817.4Nicin L, Abplanalp WT, Mellentin H, Kattih B, Tombor L, John D, Schmitto JD, Heineke J, Emrich F, Arsalan M, Holubec T, Walther T, Zeiher AM, Dimmeler S. Cell type-specific expression of the putative SARS-CoV-2 receptor ACE2 in human hearts. Eur Heart J 2020;41:1804–1806.5Kim IC, Kim JY, Kim HA, Han S can you take singulair and flonase at the same time.

COVID-19-related myocarditis in a 21-year-old female patient. Eur Heart can you take singulair and flonase at the same time J 2020;41:1859.6Zhou R. Does SARS-CoV-2 cause viral myocarditis in COVID-19 patients?.

Eur Heart J 2020;41:2123.7Shi S, can you take singulair and flonase at the same time Qin M, Cai Y, Liu T, Shen B, Yang F, Cao S, Liu X, Xiang Y, Zhao Q, Huang H, Yang B, Huang C. Characteristics and clinical significance of myocardial injury in patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019. Eur Heart J 2020;41:2070–2079.8Azarkish M, Laleh Far V, Eslami M, Mollazadeh R.

Transient complete heart block can you take singulair and flonase at the same time in a patient with critical COVID-19. Eur Heart J 2020;41:2131.9Inciardi RM, Adamo M, Lupi L, Cani DS, Di Pasquale M, Tomasoni D, Italia L, Zaccone G, Tedino C, Fabbricatore D, Curnis A, Faggiano P, Gorga E, Lombardi CM, Milesi G, Vizzardi E, Volpini M, Nodari S, Specchia C, Maroldi R, Bezzi M, Metra M. Characteristics and can you take singulair and flonase at the same time outcomes of patients hospitalized for COVID-19 and cardiac disease in Northern Italy.

Eur Heart J 2020;41:1821–1829.10Libby P, Lüscher T. COVID-19 is, in the end, can you take singulair and flonase at the same time an endothelial disease. Eur Heart J 2020;41:3038–3044.11Pericàs JM, Hernandez-Meneses M, Sheahan TP, Quintana E, Ambrosioni J, Sandoval E, Falces C, Marcos MA, Tuset M, Vilella A, Moreno A, Miro JM.

COVID-19. From epidemiology can you take singulair and flonase at the same time to treatment. Eur Heart J 2020;41:2092–2112.12De Rosa S, Spaccarotella C, Basso C, Calabrò MP, Curcio A, Filardi PP, Mancone M, Mercuro G, Muscoli S, Nodari S, Pedrinelli R, Sinagra G, Indolfi C.

Reduction of hospitalizations for myocardial infarction in can you take singulair and flonase at the same time Italy in the COVID-19 era. Eur Heart J 2020;41:2083–2088.13Mafham MM, Spata E, Goldacre R, Gair D, Curnow P, Bray M, Hollings S, Roebuck C, Gale CP, Mamas MA, Deanfield JE, de Belder MA, Luescher TF, Denwood T, Landray MJ, Emberson JR, Collins R, Morris EJA, Casadei B, Baigent C. COVID-19 pandemic can you take singulair and flonase at the same time and admission rates for and management of acute coronary syndromes in England.

Lancet 2020;396:381–389.14Lelieveld J, Münzel T. Air pollution, can you take singulair and flonase at the same time the underestimated cardiovascular risk factor. Eur Heart J 2020;41:904–905.15Baldi E, Sechi GM, Mare C, Canevari F, Brancaglione A, Primi R, Klersy C, Palo A, Contri E, Ronchi V, Beretta G, Reali F, Parogni P, Facchin F, Rizzi U, Bussi D, Ruggeri S, Oltrona Visconti L, Savastano S.

COVID-19 kills at home. The close relationship between the epidemic and the can you take singulair and flonase at the same time increase of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. Eur Heart J 2020;41:3045–3054.16Tan HL.

How does can you take singulair and flonase at the same time COVID-19 kill at home. And what should we do about it?. Eur Heart J 2020;41:3055–3057.17Gue YX, Gorog can you take singulair and flonase at the same time DA.

Reduction in ACE2 may mediate the prothrombotic phenotype in COVID-19. Eur Heart J 2020;doi:10.1093/eurheartj/ehaa534.18Fauvel C, Weizman O, Trimaille A, Mika D, Pommier T, Pace N, Douair A, Barbin E, Fraix A, Bouchot O, Benmansour O, Godeau G, Mecheri Y, Lebourdon R, Yvorel C, Massin M, Leblon T, Chabbi C, Cugney E, Benabou L, Aubry M, Chan C, Boufoula I, Barnaud C, Bothorel L, Duceau B, Sutter W, Waldmann V, Bonnet G, Cohen A, Pezel T. Pulmonary embolism in COVID-19 patients can you take singulair and flonase at the same time.

A French multicentre cohort study. Eur Heart J can you take singulair and flonase at the same time 2020;41:3058–3068.19Torbicki A. COVID-19 and pulmonary embolism.

An unwanted can you take singulair and flonase at the same time alliance. Eur Heart J 2020;41:3069–3071.20Lazzerini PE, Laghi-Pasini F, Acampa M, Srivastava U, Bertolozzi I, Giabbani B, Finizola F, Vanni F, Dokollari A, Natale M, Cevenini G, Selvi E, Migliacci N, Maccherini M, Boutjdir M, Capecchi PL. Systemic inflammation rapidly induces reversible atrial electrical remodeling.

The role of interleukin-6-mediated changes in connexin can you take singulair and flonase at the same time expression. J Am Heart Assoc 2019;8:e011006.21Steffel J, Lüscher TF, Tanner FC. Tissue factor in cardiovascular can you take singulair and flonase at the same time diseases.

Molecular mechanisms and clinical implications. Circulation 2006;113:722–731.22Chen PS, Chen LS, Fishbein MC, Lin SF, Nattel S can you take singulair and flonase at the same time. Role of the autonomic nervous system in atrial fibrillation.

Pathophysiology and therapy. Circ Res 2014;114:1500–1515.23Holt A, Gislason GH, Schou M, can you take singulair and flonase at the same time Zareini B, Biering-Sørensen T, Phelps M, Kragholm K, Andersson C, Fosbøl EL, Hansen ML, Gerds TA, Køber L, Torp-Pedersen C, Lamberts M. New-onset atrial fibrillation.

Incidence, characteristics, can you take singulair and flonase at the same time and related events following a national COVID-19 lockdown of 5.6 million people. Eur Heart J 2020;41:3072–3079.24Blomström-Lundqvist C. Effects of COVID-19 lockdown can you take singulair and flonase at the same time strategies on management of atrial fibrillation.

Eur Heart J 2020;41:3080–3082.25Konstantinides SV, Torbicki A, Agnelli G, Danchin N, Fitzmaurice D, Galiè N, Gibbs JSR, Huisman MV, Humbert M, Kucher N, Lang I, Lankeit M, Lekakis J, Maack C, Mayer E, Meneveau N, Perrier A, Pruszczyk P, Rasmussen LH, Schindler TH, Svitil P, Vonk Noordegraaf A, Zamorano JL, Zompatori M, Zamorano JL, Achenbach S, Baumgartner H, Bax JJ, Bueno H, Dean V, Deaton C, Erol Ç, Fagard R, Ferrari R, Hasdai D, Hoes A, Kirchhof P, Knuuti J, Kolh P, Lancellotti P, Linhart A, Nihoyannopoulos P, Piepoli MF, Ponikowski P, Sirnes PA, Tamargo JL, Tendera M, Torbicki A, Wijns W, Windecker S, Erol Ç, Jimenez D, Ageno W, Agewall S, Asteggiano R, Bauersachs R, Becattini C, Bounameaux H, Büller HR, Davos CH, Deaton C, Geersing G-J, Sanchez MAG, Hendriks J, Hoes A, Kilickap M, Mareev V, Monreal M, Morais J, Nihoyannopoulos P, Popescu BA, Sanchez O, Spyropoulos AC. 2014 ESC Guidelines on can you take singulair and flonase at the same time the diagnosis and management of acute pulmonary embolism. The Task Force for the Diagnosis and Management of Acute Pulmonary Embolism of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

Endorsed by the European Respiratory Society (ERS). Eur Heart can you take singulair and flonase at the same time J 2014;35:3033–3080.26Devereaux PJ, Szczeklik W. Myocardial injury after non-cardiac surgery.

Diagnosis and can you take singulair and flonase at the same time management. Eur Heart J 2020;41:3083–3091.27Sanchis-Gomar F, Perez-Quilis C, Lavie CJ. Should atrial fibrillation be considered can you take singulair and flonase at the same time a cardiovascular risk factor for a worse prognosis in COVID-19 patients?.

Eur Heart J 2020;41:3092–3093.28Culebras E, Hernández F. ACE2 is on the X chromosome. Could this explain can you take singulair and flonase at the same time COVID-19 gender differences?.

Eur Heart J 2020;41:3095.29Sama IE, Voors AA. Men more vulnerable to COVID-19 can you take singulair and flonase at the same time. Explained by ACE2 on the X chromosome?.

Eur Heart J 2020;41:3096.30Schmidt IM, Verma A, Waikar SS can you take singulair and flonase at the same time. Circulating plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 concentrations in patients with kidney disease. Eur Heart J 2020;41:3097–3098.31Sama IE, Voors AA.

Circulating plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 concentration is elevated in patients with kidney disease and can you take singulair and flonase at the same time diabetes. Eur Heart J 2020;41:3099. Published on behalf of the European Society of can you take singulair and flonase at the same time Cardiology.

All rights reserved. © The Author(s) 2020 can you take singulair and flonase at the same time. For permissions, please email.

€‚For the podcast associated with this article, please visit singulair online purchase https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/pages/Podcasts. First scienceThe COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world and has refocused science, including cardiovascular (CV) research.1 This virus not only affects the throat and lungs, but also profoundly impacts the CV system. First of all, male sex, obesity, hypertension,2 diabetes and cardiac conditions at large singulair online purchase increased the risk of infection, possibly related to angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) expression,3,4 and of an unfavourable disease course.

Secondly, COVID-19 affects the heart, leading to myocarditis,5,6 myocardial injury,7 scar formation and arrhythmias, and heart block,8 as well as affecting the blood vessels, leading to vascular occlusion due to local thrombus formation or embolism and eventually cardiac death.9 The mechanisms involved are the usual suspects, as outlined in the Viewpoint ‘COVID-19 is, in the end, an endothelial disease’, by Peter Libby from the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, USA and myself. It is well known that the vascular endothelium provides the crucial interface between the circulating blood and tissues, and displays remarkable properties that normally maintain homeostasis.10 This tightly regulated array singulair online purchase of functions includes control of haemostasis, fibrinolysis, inflammation, oxidative stress, vascular permeability, and eventually vasomotion and vascular structure. While these functions participate in the moment to moment regulation of the circulation and coordinate many host defence mechanisms, they can also contribute to disease when their usually homeostatic and defensive functions overreach and turn against the host, as is the case with SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing the current pandemic (Figure 1).

Figure 1Cytokine singulair online purchase storm. Proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1 and TNF-α induce each other’s gene expression, unleashing an amplification loop that sustains the cytokine storm. The endothelial cell is a key target of cytokines, as they induce action of a central proinflammatory transcriptional hub, nuclear factor-κB.

IL-1 also cause substantial increases in production by endothelial and singulair online purchase other cells of IL-6, the instigator of the hepatocyte acute phase response. The acute phase reactants include fibrinogen, the precursor of clot, and PAI-1, the major inhibitor of our endogenous fibrinolytic system. C-reactive protein, commonly elevated in COVID-19, provides a readily measured singulair online purchase biomarker of inflammatory status.

The alterations in the thrombotic/fibrinolytic balance due to the acute phase response predisposes towards thrombosis in arteries, in the microvasculature including that of organs such as the myocardium and kidney, and in veins, causing deep vein thrombosis and predisposing towards pulmonary embolism. Thus, the very same cytokines that elicit singulair online purchase abnormal endothelial functions can unleash the acute phase response which together with local endothelial dysfunction can conspire to cause the clinical complications of COVID-19. The right side of this diagram aligns therapeutic agents that attack these mechanisms of the cytokine storm and may thus limit its devastating consequences (from Libby P, Lüscher T.

COVID-19 is, in the end, an endothelial disease. See pages 3038–3044).Figure 1Cytokine singulair online purchase storm. Proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1 and TNF-α induce each other’s gene expression, unleashing an amplification loop that sustains the cytokine storm.

The endothelial singulair online purchase cell is a key target of cytokines, as they induce action of a central proinflammatory transcriptional hub, nuclear factor-κB. IL-1 also cause substantial increases in production by endothelial and other cells of IL-6, the instigator of the hepatocyte acute phase response. The acute phase reactants include fibrinogen, the precursor of clot, and PAI-1, the major inhibitor of our endogenous fibrinolytic singulair online purchase system.

C-reactive protein, commonly elevated in COVID-19, provides a readily measured biomarker of inflammatory status. The alterations in the thrombotic/fibrinolytic balance due to the acute phase response predisposes towards thrombosis in arteries, in the microvasculature including that of organs such as the myocardium and kidney, and in veins, causing deep vein thrombosis and predisposing towards pulmonary embolism. Thus, the very same cytokines that elicit abnormal endothelial functions can unleash the acute phase response which together with local endothelial dysfunction can conspire to cause the clinical complications of COVID-19 singulair online purchase.

The right side of this diagram aligns therapeutic agents that attack these mechanisms of the cytokine storm and may thus limit its devastating consequences (from Libby P, Lüscher T. COVID-19 is, in the end, singulair online purchase an endothelial disease. See pages 3038–3044).It produces protean manifestations ranging from head to toe, wreaking seemingly indiscriminate havoc on multiple organ systems including the lungs, heart, brain, kidney, and the vasculature.

This Viewpoint presents the hypothesis that COVID-19, particularly in the later singulair online purchase complicated stages, represents an endothelial disease. Cytokines, protein proinflammatory mediators, are key signals that shift endothelial function from the homeostatic into the defensive mode. The endgame of COVID-19 singulair online purchase involves a cytokine storm with positive feedback loops governing cytokine production that overwhelm counter-regulatory mechanisms.

This concept provides a unifying concept of this raging infection and a framework for rational treatment strategies at a time when we possess an only modest evidence base to guide our therapeutic attempts to confront this novel pandemic.11Surprisingly, emergency unit visits for acute cardiac conditions have declined markedly.12 Several reasons have been suggested. First, patients may have been wary of visiting hospitals during the pandemic.12,13 Secondly, with life on standstill, plaque ruptures and aortic dissections may have become less likely, and, thirdly, the marked reduction in pollution may also have had an influence.14 The first hypothesis is supported by the Fast Track manuscript ‘COVID-19 kills at home. The close relationship between the epidemic and the increase of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests’ by Simone Savastano and colleagues from the Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo in Italy.15 They included all consecutive out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) occurring in the Provinces singulair online purchase of Lodi, Cremona, Pavia, and Mantova in the 2 months following the first documented case of COVID-19 in Lombardia compared with those that occurred in the same time window in 2019.

The cumulative incidence of COVID-19 from 21 February to 20 April 2020 was 956/100 000 inhabitants and the cumulative incidence of OHCA was 21/100 000 inhabitants, with a 52% increase as compared with 2019 (Figure 2). A significant correlation was found between the difference in cumulative incidence of OHCA and the singulair online purchase cumulative incidence of COVID-19. Thus, the OHCA excess in 2020 is closely correlated to the COVID-19 pandemic.

These findings are important for furthering the understanding of the reduced emergency unit visits and for planning of future pandemics, as outlined in an Editorial by Hanno Tan from the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.16 Figure 2(A) Over a period of 60 days from 20 February, the cumulative incidence of COVID-19 per 100 000 inhabitants in the four provinces and in the overall territory (dotted line) (upper part), and the trend of the difference of OHCA between 2020 and 2019 per 100 000 inhabitants in the four provinces and in the overall territory singulair online purchase (dotted line) (bottom part). (B) The cumulative incidence of the difference in OHCA between 2020 and 2019 per 100 000 inhabitants as a function of the cumulative incidence of COVID-19 per 100 000 inhabitants, since 20 February 2020. Dots are the observed values.

The red line is singulair online purchase the function fitted using fractional polynomials. The shaded area is the 95% CI for the estimates (from Baldi E, Maria Sechi G, Mare C, Canevari F, Brancaglione A, Primi R, Klersy C, Palo A, Contri E, Ronchi V, Beretta G, Reali F, Parogni P, Facchin F, Rizzi U, Bussi D, Ruggeri S, Visconti LO, Savastano S, on behalf of the Lombardia CARe researchers. COVID-19 kills singulair online purchase at home.

The close relationship between the epidemic and the increase of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. See pages 3045–3054).Figure 2(A) Over a singulair online purchase period of 60 days from 20 February, the cumulative incidence of COVID-19 per 100 000 inhabitants in the four provinces and in the overall territory (dotted line) (upper part), and the trend of the difference of OHCA between 2020 and 2019 per 100 000 inhabitants in the four provinces and in the overall territory (dotted line) (bottom part). (B) The cumulative incidence of the difference in OHCA between 2020 and 2019 per 100 000 inhabitants as a function of the cumulative incidence of COVID-19 per 100 000 inhabitants, since 20 February 2020.

Dots are the observed values. The red singulair online purchase line is the function fitted using fractional polynomials. The shaded area is the 95% CI for the estimates (from Baldi E, Maria Sechi G, Mare C, Canevari F, Brancaglione A, Primi R, Klersy C, Palo A, Contri E, Ronchi V, Beretta G, Reali F, Parogni P, Facchin F, Rizzi U, Bussi D, Ruggeri S, Visconti LO, Savastano S, on behalf of the Lombardia CARe researchers.

COVID-19 kills at home singulair online purchase. The close relationship between the epidemic and the increase of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. See pages 3045–3054).With a prothrombotic state of the endothelium, thrombo-embolism should increase during the COVID-19 pandemic.17 This hypothesis is pursued in a Fast Track entitled ‘Pulmonary embolism in singulair online purchase COVID-19 patients.

A French multicentre cohort study’ by Ariel Cohen from the Hopital Saint-Antoine in Paris, France.18 In a retrospective multicentric observational study, the authors included consecutive patients hospitalized for COVID-19. Among 1527 patients, 6.7% patients had pulmonary embolism confirmed by computed tomographty pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Intensive care singulair online purchase unit (ICU) transfer and mechanical ventilation were significantly higher in the pulmonary embolism group.

In a univariable analysis, traditional venous thrombo-embolic risk factors and pulmonary lesion extension in chest CT were not associated with pulmonary embolism, while patients under anticoagulation prior to hospitalization or in whom it was introduced during hospitalization had a lower risk of pulmonary embolism, with an odds ratio of 0.37. Male gender, prophylactic or therapeutic anticoagulation, C-reactive protein, and time from symptom onset to singulair online purchase hospitalization were associated with pulmonary embolism. Thus, risk factors for pulmonary embolism in COVID-19 do not include traditional thrombo-embolic risk factors, but rather independent clinical and biological findings at admission.

In line with the concept outlined above, inflammation is a major driver of pulmonary embolism in COVID-19, as further discussed in a thought-provoking Editorial by Adam Torbicki from the Centre of Postgraduate Medical Education in Otwock, Poland.19Inflammation is also a trigger for atrial fibrillation as it changes the electrical properties of the atrial myocardium and eventually favours tissue fibrosis.20 Furthermore, inflammation may trigger tissue factor expression in the atrial endothelium and favour thrombus formation.21 On the other hand, life on standstill may reduce sympathetic drive and hence reduce the singulair online purchase likelihood of new-onset atrial fibrillation.22 In their article entitled ‘New-onset atrial fibrillation. Incidence, characteristics, and related events following a national COVID-19 lockdown of 5.6 million people’, Anders Holt and colleagues from the Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev and Gentofte in Hellerup, Denmark resolved this conundrum.23 During 3 weeks of lockdown, weekly incidence rates of new-onset AF were 2.3, 1.8, and 1.5 per 1000 person-years, while during the corresponding weeks in 2019, incidence rates were 3.5, 3.4, and 3.6 per 1000 person-years. Incidence rate ratios singulair online purchase comparing the same weeks were 0.66, 0.53, and 0.41.

Patients diagnosed during lockdown were younger and had lower CHA2DS2-VASc-scores. During the first 3 weeks of lockdown, 7.8% of patients experienced an ischaemic stroke or death within 7 days of new-onset atrial fibrillation compared with 5.6% during the equivalent weeks in 2019, corresponding to an odds ratio of 1.41. Thus, following a national lockdown in Denmark, new-onset atrial fibrillation declined by 47%, while ischaemic stroke or singulair online purchase death within 7 days increased.

These complex findings are put into context in an excellent Editorial by Carina Blomstrom-Lundqvist from the Department of Medical Science in Uppsala, Sweden.24Myocardial injury after non-cardiac surgery or MINS is caused by myocardial ischaemia due to a supply–demand mismatch or thrombus and is associated with an increased risk of mortality and major adverse CV events or MACE.25 In their review ‘Myocardial injury after non-cardiac surgery. Diagnosis and management’ Philip Devereaux and colleagues from McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada note that the diagnostic criteria for MINS include elevated post-operative troponin levels with no evidence of a non-ischaemic aetiology during or within singulair online purchase 30 days after non-cardiac surgery, and without ischaemic features such as chest pain or ECG changes.26 Patients with MINS should receive aspirin and a statin, unless contraindicated, and an NOAC (non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant) if not at high bleeding risk. Cardiac catheterization is only recommended for those with recurrent ischaemia, heart failure, or high risk based on non-invasive imaging.

Troponin should be measured for the first few days after surgery in patients ≥65 years or with atherosclerotic disease to avoid missing MINS and the opportunity for secondary prophylactic measures and follow-up.Finally, the issue is complemented by various singulair online purchase Discussion Forum contributions on this very timely topic. In a contribution entitled ‘Should atrial fibrillation be considered a cardiovascular risk factor for a worse prognosis in COVID-19 patients?. €™, Fabian Sanchis-Gomar from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Valencia, Spain discuss the recent publication ‘Characteristics and outcomes of patients hospitalized for COVID-19 and cardiac disease in Northern Italy’ by Marco Metra and colleagues from Brescia, Italy.9,27 Metra et al.

Respond in turn singulair online purchase. In a comment entitled ‘ACE2 is on the X chromosome. Could this explain COVID-19 gender singulair online purchase differences?.

€™ Felix Hernandez from the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa in Madrid, and his colleague Esther Culebras discuss the recent publication entitled ‘Circulating plasma concentrations of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 in men and women with heart failure and effects of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone inhibitors’ by Adriaan Voors and colleagues from the University Medical Center Groningen in the Netherlands.3,28 Voors et al. Respond in a separate comment.29In a contribution entitled ‘Circulating plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 concentrations in patients with kidney disease’, Insa Marie Schmidt and colleagues from the Boston University in Massachusetts, USA also comment on the article by Voors et al.3,30 Voors and colleagues respond in a separate message to this piece.31 Time for the last wordsThis is my last Issue@aGlance in the European Heart Journal in my role of Editor-in-Chief singulair online purchase. It has been a pleasure and honour to serve both authors and readers of this fine journal and the European Society of Cardiology over more than a decade.

My goal has always been to make it more attractive and informative for clinicians and important and stimulating for scientists worldwide. I hope singulair online purchase you have enjoyed it. Needless to say, that was only possible thanks to an amazing team of editors, reviewers, authors, and editorial staff.

I hope that you enjoy this very last issue under singulair online purchase my leadership. The time has come to hand the European Heart Journal over to the new Editor-in-Chief, Filippo Crea from Rome. I am certain Professor Crea will do an excellent job with his new singulair online purchase team, retaining some of the experienced editorial staff from Zurich.

Thank you for submitting to, reviewing for, and reading the European Heart Journal, and goodbye—I am sure we will stay in touch.With thanks to Amelia Meier-Batschelet for help with compilation of this article. References1Anker SD, Butler J, Khan MS, Abraham WT, Bauersachs J, Bocchi E, Bozkurt B, Braunwald E, Chopra VK, Cleland JG, Ezekowitz J, Filippatos G, Friede T, Hernandez AF, Lam CSP, Lindenfeld J, McMurray JJV, Mehra M, Metra M, Packer M, Pieske B, Pocock SJ, Ponikowski P, Rosano GMC, Teerlink JR, Tsutsui H, Van Veldhuisen DJ, Verma S, Voors AA, Wittes J, Zannad F, Zhang J, Seferovic P, Coats AJS. Conducting clinical trials in heart failure during (and after) the COVID-19 singulair online purchase pandemic.

An Expert Consensus Position Paper from the Heart Failure Association (HFA) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Eur Heart J 2020;41:2109–2117.2Gao C, Cai Y, Zhang K, Zhou L, Zhang Y, Zhang X, Li Q, Li singulair online purchase W, Yang S, Zhao X, Zhao Y, Wang H, Liu Y, Yin Z, Zhang R, Wang R, Yang M, Hui C, Wijns W, McEvoy JW, Soliman O, Onuma Y, Serruys PW, Tao L, Li F. Association of hypertension and antihypertensive treatment with COVID-19 mortality.

A retrospective observational singulair online purchase study. Eur Heart J 2020;41:2058–2066.3Sama IE, Ravera A, Santema BT, van Goor H, Ter Maaten JM, Cleland JGF, Rienstra M, Friedrich AW, Samani NJ, Ng LL, Dickstein K, Lang CC, Filippatos G, Anker SD, Ponikowski P, Metra M, van Veldhuisen DJ, Voors AA. Circulating plasma concentrations of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 in men and women with heart failure and effects singulair online purchase of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone inhibitors.

Eur Heart J 2020;41:1810–1817.4Nicin L, Abplanalp WT, Mellentin H, Kattih B, Tombor L, John D, Schmitto JD, Heineke J, Emrich F, Arsalan M, Holubec T, Walther T, Zeiher AM, Dimmeler S. Cell type-specific expression of the putative SARS-CoV-2 receptor ACE2 in human hearts. Eur Heart J 2020;41:1804–1806.5Kim IC, Kim JY, Kim HA, Han singulair online purchase S.

COVID-19-related myocarditis in a 21-year-old female patient. Eur Heart J singulair online purchase 2020;41:1859.6Zhou R. Does SARS-CoV-2 cause viral myocarditis in COVID-19 patients?.

Eur Heart J 2020;41:2123.7Shi S, singulair online purchase Qin M, Cai Y, Liu T, Shen B, Yang F, Cao S, Liu X, Xiang Y, Zhao Q, Huang H, Yang B, Huang C. Characteristics and clinical significance of myocardial injury in patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019. Eur Heart J 2020;41:2070–2079.8Azarkish M, Laleh Far V, Eslami M, Mollazadeh R.

Transient complete heart block in a singulair online purchase patient with critical COVID-19. Eur Heart J 2020;41:2131.9Inciardi RM, Adamo M, Lupi L, Cani DS, Di Pasquale M, Tomasoni D, Italia L, Zaccone G, Tedino C, Fabbricatore D, Curnis A, Faggiano P, Gorga E, Lombardi CM, Milesi G, Vizzardi E, Volpini M, Nodari S, Specchia C, Maroldi R, Bezzi M, Metra M. Characteristics and outcomes of singulair online purchase patients hospitalized for COVID-19 and cardiac disease in Northern Italy.

Eur Heart J 2020;41:1821–1829.10Libby P, Lüscher T. COVID-19 is, in singulair online purchase the end, an endothelial disease. Eur Heart J 2020;41:3038–3044.11Pericàs JM, Hernandez-Meneses M, Sheahan TP, Quintana E, Ambrosioni J, Sandoval E, Falces C, Marcos MA, Tuset M, Vilella A, Moreno A, Miro JM.

COVID-19. From epidemiology singulair online purchase to treatment. Eur Heart J 2020;41:2092–2112.12De Rosa S, Spaccarotella C, Basso C, Calabrò MP, Curcio A, Filardi PP, Mancone M, Mercuro G, Muscoli S, Nodari S, Pedrinelli R, Sinagra G, Indolfi C.

Reduction of singulair online purchase hospitalizations for myocardial infarction in Italy in the COVID-19 era. Eur Heart J 2020;41:2083–2088.13Mafham MM, Spata E, Goldacre R, Gair D, Curnow P, Bray M, Hollings S, Roebuck C, Gale CP, Mamas MA, Deanfield JE, de Belder MA, Luescher TF, Denwood T, Landray MJ, Emberson JR, Collins R, Morris EJA, Casadei B, Baigent C. COVID-19 pandemic and admission rates singulair online purchase for and management of acute coronary syndromes in England.

Lancet 2020;396:381–389.14Lelieveld J, Münzel T. Air pollution, the underestimated cardiovascular risk singulair online purchase factor. Eur Heart J 2020;41:904–905.15Baldi E, Sechi GM, Mare C, Canevari F, Brancaglione A, Primi R, Klersy C, Palo A, Contri E, Ronchi V, Beretta G, Reali F, Parogni P, Facchin F, Rizzi U, Bussi D, Ruggeri S, Oltrona Visconti L, Savastano S.

COVID-19 kills at home. The close singulair online purchase relationship between the epidemic and the increase of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. Eur Heart J 2020;41:3045–3054.16Tan HL.

How does COVID-19 singulair online purchase kill at home. And what should we do about it?. Eur Heart J 2020;41:3055–3057.17Gue YX, singulair online purchase Gorog DA.

Reduction in ACE2 may mediate the prothrombotic phenotype in COVID-19. Eur Heart J 2020;doi:10.1093/eurheartj/ehaa534.18Fauvel C, Weizman O, Trimaille A, Mika D, Pommier T, Pace N, Douair A, Barbin E, Fraix A, Bouchot O, Benmansour O, Godeau G, Mecheri Y, Lebourdon R, Yvorel C, Massin M, Leblon T, Chabbi C, Cugney E, Benabou L, Aubry M, Chan C, Boufoula I, Barnaud C, Bothorel L, Duceau B, Sutter W, Waldmann V, Bonnet G, Cohen A, Pezel T. Pulmonary embolism singulair online purchase in COVID-19 patients.

A French multicentre cohort study. Eur Heart J singulair online purchase 2020;41:3058–3068.19Torbicki A. COVID-19 and pulmonary embolism.

An unwanted singulair online purchase alliance. Eur Heart J 2020;41:3069–3071.20Lazzerini PE, Laghi-Pasini F, Acampa M, Srivastava U, Bertolozzi I, Giabbani B, Finizola F, Vanni F, Dokollari A, Natale M, Cevenini G, Selvi E, Migliacci N, Maccherini M, Boutjdir M, Capecchi PL. Systemic inflammation rapidly induces reversible atrial electrical remodeling.

The role of interleukin-6-mediated changes in connexin expression singulair online purchase. J Am Heart Assoc 2019;8:e011006.21Steffel J, Lüscher TF, Tanner FC. Tissue factor in cardiovascular singulair online purchase diseases.

Molecular mechanisms and clinical implications. Circulation 2006;113:722–731.22Chen singulair online purchase PS, Chen LS, Fishbein MC, Lin SF, Nattel S. Role of the autonomic nervous system in atrial fibrillation.

Pathophysiology and therapy. Circ Res 2014;114:1500–1515.23Holt A, Gislason GH, Schou M, Zareini B, Biering-Sørensen T, singulair online purchase Phelps M, Kragholm K, Andersson C, Fosbøl EL, Hansen ML, Gerds TA, Køber L, Torp-Pedersen C, Lamberts M. New-onset atrial fibrillation.

Incidence, characteristics, and related events following a singulair online purchase national COVID-19 lockdown of 5.6 million people. Eur Heart J 2020;41:3072–3079.24Blomström-Lundqvist C. Effects of COVID-19 lockdown strategies on management of atrial singulair online purchase fibrillation.

Eur Heart J 2020;41:3080–3082.25Konstantinides SV, Torbicki A, Agnelli G, Danchin N, Fitzmaurice D, Galiè N, Gibbs JSR, Huisman MV, Humbert M, Kucher N, Lang I, Lankeit M, Lekakis J, Maack C, Mayer E, Meneveau N, Perrier A, Pruszczyk P, Rasmussen LH, Schindler TH, Svitil P, Vonk Noordegraaf A, Zamorano JL, Zompatori M, Zamorano JL, Achenbach S, Baumgartner H, Bax JJ, Bueno H, Dean V, Deaton C, Erol Ç, Fagard R, Ferrari R, Hasdai D, Hoes A, Kirchhof P, Knuuti J, Kolh P, Lancellotti P, Linhart A, Nihoyannopoulos P, Piepoli MF, Ponikowski P, Sirnes PA, Tamargo JL, Tendera M, Torbicki A, Wijns W, Windecker S, Erol Ç, Jimenez D, Ageno W, Agewall S, Asteggiano R, Bauersachs R, Becattini C, Bounameaux H, Büller HR, Davos CH, Deaton C, Geersing G-J, Sanchez MAG, Hendriks J, Hoes A, Kilickap M, Mareev V, Monreal M, Morais J, Nihoyannopoulos P, Popescu BA, Sanchez O, Spyropoulos AC. 2014 ESC singulair online purchase Guidelines on the diagnosis and management of acute pulmonary embolism. The Task Force for the Diagnosis and Management of Acute Pulmonary Embolism of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

Endorsed by the European Respiratory Society (ERS). Eur Heart J 2014;35:3033–3080.26Devereaux singulair online purchase PJ, Szczeklik W. Myocardial injury after non-cardiac surgery.

Diagnosis and management singulair online purchase. Eur Heart J 2020;41:3083–3091.27Sanchis-Gomar F, Perez-Quilis C, Lavie CJ. Should atrial fibrillation be considered a cardiovascular risk factor for a worse prognosis in COVID-19 singulair online purchase patients?.

Eur Heart J 2020;41:3092–3093.28Culebras E, Hernández F. ACE2 is on the X chromosome. Could this singulair online purchase explain COVID-19 gender differences?.

Eur Heart J 2020;41:3095.29Sama IE, Voors AA. Men more vulnerable to singulair online purchase COVID-19. Explained by ACE2 on the X chromosome?.

Eur Heart singulair online purchase J 2020;41:3096.30Schmidt IM, Verma A, Waikar SS. Circulating plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 concentrations in patients with kidney disease. Eur Heart J 2020;41:3097–3098.31Sama IE, Voors AA.

Circulating plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 concentration is elevated in patients with singulair online purchase kidney disease and diabetes. Eur Heart J 2020;41:3099. Published on behalf of the singulair online purchase European Society of Cardiology.

All rights reserved. © The singulair online purchase Author(s) 2020. For permissions, please email.

Singulair 4

Specificity of SARS-CoV-2 Antibody Assays Both assays measuring pan-Ig antibodies had low numbers of false positives singulair 4 among samples collected in 2017. There were 0 and 1 false positives for the two assays among 472 samples, results that compared favorably with those obtained with the single IgM anti-N and IgG anti-N assays (Table singulair 4 S3). Because of the low prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in Iceland, we required positive results from both pan-Ig antibody assays for a sample to be considered seropositive (see Supplementary Methods in Supplementary Appendix 1).

None of the samples collected in singulair 4 early 2020 group were seropositive, which indicates that the virus had not spread widely in Iceland before February 2020. SARS-CoV-2 Antibodies among qPCR-Positive Persons Figure 2. Figure 2 singulair 4.

Antibody Prevalence and Titers among qPCR-Positive Cases as a Function of Time since Diagnosis by qPCR. Shown are the singulair 4 percentages of samples positive for both pan-Ig antibody assays and the antibody titers. Red denotes the count or percentage of samples among persons during their hospitalization (249 samples from 48 persons), and blue denotes the count or percentage of samples among persons after they were declared recovered (1853 samples from 1215 persons).

Vertical bars denote 95% confidence intervals singulair 4. The dashed lines indicated the thresholds for a test to be declared positive. OD denotes optical density, and singulair 4 RBD receptor binding domain.Table 1.

Table 1. Prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 Antibodies singulair 4 by Sample Collection as Measured by Two Pan-Ig Antibody Assays. Twenty-five days after diagnosis by qPCR, more than 90% of samples from recovered persons tested positive with both pan-Ig antibody assays, singulair 4 and the percentage of persons testing positive remained stable thereafter (Figure 2 and Fig.

S2). Hospitalized persons seroconverted more frequently and quickly after qPCR diagnosis than singulair 4 did nonhospitalized persons (Figure 2 and Fig. S3).

Of 1215 persons who had recovered (on the singulair 4 basis of results for the most recently obtained sample from persons for whom we had multiple samples), 1107 were seropositive (91.1%. 95% confidence interval [CI], 89.4 to 92.6) (Table 1 and Table S4). Since some diagnoses may have been made on the basis of false positive singulair 4 qPCR results, we determined that 91.1% represents the lower bound of sensitivity of the combined pan-Ig tests for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies among recovered persons.

Table 2. Table 2 singulair 4. Results of Repeated Pan-Ig Antibody Tests among Recovered qPCR-Diagnosed Persons.

Among the 487 recovered persons with two or more samples, singulair 4 19 (4%) had different pan-Ig antibody test results at different time points (Table 2 and Fig. S4). It is notable that of the 22 persons with an early singulair 4 sample that tested negative for both pan-Ig antibodies, 19 remained negative at the most recent test date (again, for both antibodies).

One person tested positive for both pan-Ig antibodies in the first test and negative for both in the most recent test. The longitudinal changes in antibody levels among recovered singulair 4 persons were consistent with the cross-sectional results (Fig. S5).

Antibody levels were higher in the last sample than in the first sample when the antibodies were measured with the two pan-Ig assays, slightly lower than in the first sample when measured with IgG anti-N and IgG anti-S1 assays, and substantially lower than in the first sample when measured with IgM anti-N and IgA anti-S1 assays. IgG anti-N, IgM anti-N, IgG anti-S1, and IgA anti-S1 antibody levels were correlated among the qPCR-positive persons (Figs. S5 and S6 and Table S5).

Antibody levels measured with both pan-Ig antibody assays increased over the first 2 months after qPCR diagnosis and remained at a plateau over the next 2 months of the study. IgM anti-N antibody levels increased rapidly soon after diagnosis and then fell rapidly and were generally not detected after 2 months. IgA anti-S1 antibodies decreased 1 month after diagnosis and remained detectable thereafter.

IgG anti-N and anti-S1 antibody levels increased during the first 6 weeks after diagnosis and then decreased slightly. SARS-CoV-2 Infection in Quarantine Table 3. Table 3.

SARS-CoV-2 Infection among Quarantined Persons According to Exposure Type and Presence of Symptoms. Of the 1797 qPCR-positive Icelanders, 1088 (61%) were in quarantine when SARS-CoV-2 infection was diagnosed by qPCR. We tested for antibodies among 4222 quarantined persons who had not tested qPCR-positive (they had received a negative result by qPCR or had simply not been tested).

Of those 4222 quarantined persons, 97 (2.3%. 95% CI, 1.9 to 2.8) were seropositive (Table 1). Those with household exposure were 5.2 (95% CI, 3.3 to 8.0) times more likely to be seropositive than those with other types of exposure (Table 3).

Similarly, a positive result by qPCR for those with household exposure was 5.2 (95% CI, 4.5 to 6.1) times more likely than for those with other types of exposure. When these two sets of results (qPCR-positive and seropositive) were combined, we calculated that 26.6% of quarantined persons with household exposure and 5.0% of quarantined persons without household exposure were infected. Those who had symptoms during quarantine were 3.2 (95% CI, 1.7 to 6.2) times more likely to be seropositive and 18.2 times (95% CI, 14.8 to 22.4) more likely to test positive with qPCR than those without symptoms.

We also tested persons in two regions of Iceland affected by cluster outbreaks. In a SARS-CoV-2 cluster in Vestfirdir, 1.4% of residents were qPCR-positive and 10% of residents were quarantined. We found that none of the 326 persons outside quarantine who had not been tested by qPCR (or who tested negative) were seropositive.

In a cluster in Vestmannaeyjar, 2.3% of residents were qPCR-positive and 13% of residents were quarantined. Of the 447 quarantined persons who had not received a qPCR-positive result, 4 were seropositive (0.9%. 95% CI, 0.3 to 2.1).

Of the 663 outside quarantine in Vestmannaeyjar, 3 were seropositive (0.5%. 95% CI, 0.1 to 0.2%). SARS-CoV-2 Seroprevalence in Iceland None of the serum samples collected from 470 healthy Icelanders between February 18 and March 9, 2020, tested positive for both pan-Ig antibodies, although four were positive for the pan-Ig anti-N assay (0.9%), a finding that suggests that the virus had not spread widely in Iceland before March 9.

Of the 18,609 persons tested for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies through contact with the Icelandic health care system for reasons other than Covid-19, 39 were positive for both pan-Ig antibody assays (estimated seroprevalence by weighting the sample on the basis of residence, sex, and 10-year age category, 0.3%. 95% CI, 0.2 to 0.4). There were regional differences in the percentages of qPCR-positive persons across Iceland that were roughly proportional to the percentage of people quarantined (Table S6).

However, after exclusion of the qPCR-positive and quarantined persons, the percentage of persons who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies did not correlate with the percentage of those who tested positive by qPCR. The estimated seroprevalence in the random sample collection from Reykjavik (0.4%. 95% CI, 0.3 to 0.6) was similar to that in the Health Care group (0.3%.

95% CI, 0.2 to 0.4) (Table S6). We calculate that 0.5% of the residents of Iceland have tested positive with qPCR. The 2.3% with SARS-CoV-2 seroconversion among persons in quarantine extrapolates to 0.1% of Icelandic residents.

On the basis of this finding and the seroprevalence from the Health Care group, we estimate that 0.9% (95% CI, 0.8 to 0.9) of the population of Iceland has been infected by SARS-CoV-2. Approximately 56% of all SARS-CoV-2 infections were therefore diagnosed by qPCR, 14% occurred in quarantine without having been diagnosed with qPCR, and the remaining 30% of infections occurred outside quarantine and were not detected by qPCR. Deaths from Covid-19 in Iceland In Iceland, 10 deaths have been attributed to Covid-19, which corresponds to 3 deaths per 100,000 nationwide.

Among the qPCR-positive cases, 0.6% (95% CI, 0.3 to 1.0) were fatal. Using the 0.9% prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in Iceland as the denominator, however, we calculate an infection fatality risk of 0.3% (95% CI, 0.2 to 0.6). Stratified by age, the infection fatality risk was substantially lower in those 70 years old or younger (0.1%.

95% CI, 0.0 to 0.3) than in those over 70 years of age (4.4%. 95% CI, 1.9 to 8.4) (Table S7). Age, Sex, Clinical Characteristics, and Antibody Levels Table 4.

Table 4. Association of Existing Conditions and Covid-19 Severity with SARS-CoV-2 Antibody Levels among Recovered Persons. SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels were higher in older people and in those who were hospitalized (Table 4, and Table S8 [described in Supplementary Appendix 1 and available in Supplementary Appendix 2]).

Pan-Ig anti–S1-RBD and IgA anti-S1 levels were lower in female persons. Of the preexisting conditions, and after adjustment for multiple testing, we found that body-mass index, smoking status, and use of antiinflammatory medication were associated with SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels. Body-mass index correlated positively with antibody levels.

Smokers and users of antiinflammatory medication had lower antibody levels. With respect to clinical characteristics, antibody levels were most strongly associated with hospitalization and clinical severity, followed by clinical symptoms such as fever, maximum temperature reading, cough, and loss of appetite. Severity of these individual symptoms, with the exception of loss of energy, was associated with higher antibody levels.To the Editor.

Rapid and accurate diagnostic tests are essential for controlling the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic. Although the current standard involves testing of nasopharyngeal swab specimens by quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) to detect SARS-CoV-2, saliva specimens may be an alternative diagnostic sample.1-4 Rigorous evaluation is needed to determine how saliva specimens compare with nasopharyngeal swab specimens with respect to sensitivity in detection of SARS-CoV-2 during the course of infection. A total of 70 inpatients with Covid-19 provided written informed consent to participate in our study (see the Methods section in Supplementary Appendix 1, available with the full text of this letter at NEJM.org).

After Covid-19 was confirmed with a positive nasopharyngeal swab specimen at hospital admission, we obtained additional samples from the patients during hospitalization. We tested saliva specimens collected by the patients themselves and nasopharyngeal swabs collected from the patients at the same time point by health care workers. Figure 1.

Figure 1. SARS-CoV-2 RNA Titers in Saliva Specimens and Nasopharyngeal Swab Specimens. Samples were obtained from 70 hospital inpatients who had a diagnosis of Covid-19.

Panel A shows SARS-CoV-2 RNA titers in the first available nasopharyngeal and saliva samples. The lines indicate samples from the same patient. Results were compared with the use of a Wilcoxon signed-rank test (P<0.001).

Panel B shows percentages of positivity for SARS-CoV-2 in tests of the first matched nasopharyngeal and saliva samples at 1 to 5 days, 6 to 10 days, and 11 or more days (maximum, 53 days) after the diagnosis of Covid-19. Panel C shows longitudinal SARS-CoV-2 RNA copies per milliliter in 97 saliva samples, according to days since symptom onset. Each circle represents a separate sample.

Dashed lines indicate additional samples from the same patient. The red line indicates a negative saliva sample that was followed by a positive sample at the next collection of a specimen. Panel D shows longitudinal SARS-CoV-2 RNA copies per milliliter in 97 nasopharyngeal swab specimens, according to days since symptom onset.

The red lines indicate negative nasopharyngeal swab specimens there were followed by a positive swab at the next collection of a specimen. The gray area in Panels C and D indicates samples that were below the lower limit of detection of 5610 virus RNA copies per milliliter of sample, which is at cycle threshold 38 of our quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay targeting the SARS-CoV-2 N1 sequence recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To analyze these data, we used a linear mixed-effects regression model (see Supplementary Appendix 1) that accounts for the correlation between samples collected from the same person at a single time point (i.e., multivariate response) and the correlation between samples collected across time from the same patient (i.e., repeated measures).

All the data used to generate this figure, including the raw cycle thresholds, are provided in Supplementary Data 1 in Supplementary Appendix 2.Using primer sequences from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we detected more SARS-CoV-2 RNA copies in the saliva specimens (mean log copies per milliliter, 5.58. 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.09 to 6.07) than in the nasopharyngeal swab specimens (mean log copies per milliliter, 4.93. 95% CI, 4.53 to 5.33) (Figure 1A, and Fig.

S1 in Supplementary Appendix 1). In addition, a higher percentage of saliva samples than nasopharyngeal swab samples were positive up to 10 days after the Covid-19 diagnosis (Figure 1B). At 1 to 5 days after diagnosis, 81% (95% CI, 71 to 96) of the saliva samples were positive, as compared with 71% (95% CI, 67 to 94) of the nasopharyngeal swab specimens.

These findings suggest that saliva specimens and nasopharyngeal swab specimens have at least similar sensitivity in the detection of SARS-CoV-2 during the course of hospitalization. Because the results of testing of nasopharyngeal swab specimens to detect SARS-CoV-2 may vary with repeated sampling in individual patients,5 we evaluated viral detection in matched samples over time. The level of SARS-CoV-2 RNA decreased after symptom onset in both saliva specimens (estimated slope, −0.11.

95% credible interval, −0.15 to −0.06) (Figure 1C) and nasopharyngeal swab specimens (estimated slope, −0.09. 95% credible interval, −0.13 to −0.05) (Figure 1D). In three instances, a negative nasopharyngeal swab specimen was followed by a positive swab at the next collection of a specimen (Figure 1D).

This phenomenon occurred only once with the saliva specimens (Figure 1C). During the clinical course, we observed less variation in levels of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the saliva specimens (standard deviation, 0.98 virus RNA copies per milliliter. 95% credible interval, 0.08 to 1.98) than in the nasopharyngeal swab specimens (standard deviation, 2.01 virus RNA copies per milliliter.

95% credible interval, 1.29 to 2.70) (see Supplementary Appendix 1). Recent studies have shown that SARS-CoV-2 can be detected in the saliva of asymptomatic persons and outpatients.1-3 We therefore screened 495 asymptomatic health care workers who provided written informed consent to participate in our prospective study, and we used RT-qPCR to test both saliva and nasopharyngeal samples obtained from these persons. We detected SARS-CoV-2 RNA in saliva specimens obtained from 13 persons who did not report any symptoms at or before the time of sample collection.

Of these 13 health care workers, 9 had collected matched nasopharyngeal swab specimens by themselves on the same day, and 7 of these specimens tested negative (Fig. S2). The diagnosis in the 13 health care workers with positive saliva specimens was later confirmed in diagnostic testing of additional nasopharyngeal samples by a CLIA (Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988)–certified laboratory.

Variation in nasopharyngeal sampling may be an explanation for false negative results, so monitoring an internal control for proper sample collection may provide an alternative evaluation technique. In specimens collected from inpatients by health care workers, we found greater variation in human RNase P cycle threshold (Ct) values in nasopharyngeal swab specimens (standard deviation, 2.89 Ct. 95% CI, 26.53 to 27.69) than in saliva specimens (standard deviation, 2.49 Ct.

95% CI, 23.35 to 24.35). When health care workers collected their own specimens, we also found greater variation in RNase P Ct values in nasopharyngeal swab specimens (standard deviation, 2.26 Ct. 95% CI, 28.39 to 28.56) than in saliva specimens (standard deviation , 1.65 Ct.

95% CI, 24.14 to 24.26) (Fig. S3). Collection of saliva samples by patients themselves negates the need for direct interaction between health care workers and patients.

This interaction is a source of major testing bottlenecks and presents a risk of nosocomial infection. Collection of saliva samples by patients themselves also alleviates demands for supplies of swabs and personal protective equipment. Given the growing need for testing, our findings provide support for the potential of saliva specimens in the diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Anne L. Wyllie, Ph.D.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT [email protected]John Fournier, M.D.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTArnau Casanovas-Massana, Ph.D.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CTMelissa Campbell, M.D.Maria Tokuyama, Ph.D.Pavithra Vijayakumar, B.A.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTJoshua L. Warren, Ph.D.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CTBertie Geng, M.D.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTM.

Catherine Muenker, M.S.Adam J. Moore, M.P.H.Chantal B.F. Vogels, Ph.D.Mary E.

Petrone, B.S.Isabel M. Ott, B.S.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CTPeiwen Lu, Ph.D.Arvind Venkataraman, B.S.Alice Lu-Culligan, B.S.Jonathan Klein, B.S.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTRebecca Earnest, M.P.H.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CTMichael Simonov, M.D.Rupak Datta, M.D., Ph.D.Ryan Handoko, M.D.Nida Naushad, B.S.Lorenzo R. Sewanan, M.Phil.Jordan Valdez, B.S.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTElizabeth B.

White, A.B.Sarah Lapidus, M.S.Chaney C. Kalinich, M.P.H.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CTXiaodong Jiang, M.D., Ph.D.Daniel J. Kim, A.B.Eriko Kudo, Ph.D.Melissa Linehan, M.S.Tianyang Mao, B.S.Miyu Moriyama, Ph.D.Ji E.

Oh, M.D., Ph.D.Annsea Park, B.A.Julio Silva, B.S.Eric Song, M.S.Takehiro Takahashi, M.D., Ph.D.Manabu Taura, Ph.D.Orr-El Weizman, B.A.Patrick Wong, M.S.Yexin Yang, B.S.Santos Bermejo, B.S.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTCamila D. Odio, M.D.Yale New Haven Health, New Haven, CTSaad B. Omer, M.B., B.S., Ph.D.Yale Institute for Global Health, New Haven, CTCharles S.

Dela Cruz, M.D., Ph.D.Shelli Farhadian, M.D., Ph.D.Richard A. Martinello, M.D.Akiko Iwasaki, Ph.D.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTNathan D. Grubaugh, Ph.D.Albert I.

Ko, M.D.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT [email protected], [email protected] Supported by the Huffman Family Donor Advised Fund, a Fast Grant from Emergent Ventures at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, the Yale Institute for Global Health, the Yale School of Medicine, a grant (U19 AI08992, to Dr. Ko) from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the Beatrice Kleinberg Neuwirth Fund, and a grant (Rubicon 019.181EN.004, to Dr. Vogel) from the Dutch Research Council (NWO).

Disclosure forms provided by the authors are available with the full text of this letter at NEJM.org. This letter was published on August 28, 2020, at NEJM.org. Drs.

Grubaugh and Ko contributed equally to this letter. 5 References1. Kojima N, Turner F, Slepnev V, et al.

Self-collected oral fluid and nasal swabs demonstrate comparable sensitivity to clinician collected nasopharyngeal swabs for Covid-19 detection. April 15, 2020 (https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.04.11.20062372v1). Preprint.Google Scholar2.

Williams E, Bond K, Zhang B, Putland M, Williamson DA. Saliva as a non-invasive specimen for detection of SARS-CoV-2. J Clin Microbiol 2020;58(8):e00776-20-e00776-20.3.

Pasomsub E, Watcharananan SP, Boonyawat K, et al. Saliva sample as a non-invasive specimen for the diagnosis of coronavirus disease 2019. A cross-sectional study.

Clin Microbiol Infect 2020 May 15 (Epub ahead of print).4. Vogels CBF, Brackney D, Wang J, et al. SalivaDirect.

Simple and sensitive molecular diagnostic test for SARS-CoV-2 surveillance. August 4, 2020 (https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.08.03.20167791v1). Preprint.Google Scholar5.

Zou L, Ruan F, Huang M, et al. SARS-CoV-2 viral load in upper respiratory specimens of infected patients. N Engl J Med 2020;382:1177-1179.Trial Population Table 1.

Table 1. Demographic Characteristics of the Participants in the NVX-CoV2373 Trial at Enrollment. The trial was initiated on May 26, 2020.

134 participants underwent randomization between May 27 and June 6, 2020, including 3 participants who were to serve as backups for sentinel dosing and who immediately withdrew from the trial without being vaccinated (Fig. S1). Of the 131 participants who received injections, 23 received placebo (group A), 25 received 25-μg doses of rSARS-CoV-2 (group B), 29 received 5-μg doses of rSARS-CoV-2 plus Matrix-M1, including three sentinels (group C), 28 received 25-μg doses of rSARS-CoV-2 plus Matrix-M1, including three sentinels (group D), and 26 received a single 25-μg dose of rSARS-CoV-2 plus Matrix-M1 followed by a single dose of placebo (group E).

All 131 participants received their first vaccination on day 0, and all but 3 received their second vaccination at least 21 days later. Exceptions include 2 in the placebo group (group A) who withdrew consent (unrelated to any adverse event) and 1 in the 25-μg rSARS-CoV-2 + Matrix-M1 group (group D) who had an unsolicited adverse event (mild cellulitis. See below).

Demographic characteristics of the participants are presented in Table 1. Of note, missing data were infrequent. Safety Outcomes No serious adverse events or adverse events of special interest were reported, and vaccination pause rules were not implemented.

As noted above, one participant did not receive a second vaccination owing to an unsolicited adverse event, mild cellulitis, that was associated with infection after an intravenous cannula placement to address an unrelated mild adverse event that occurred during the second week of follow-up. Second vaccination was withheld because the participant was still recovering and receiving antibiotics. This participant remains in the trial.

Figure 2. Figure 2. Solicited Local and Systemic Adverse Events.

The percentage of participants in each vaccine group (groups A, B, C, D, and E) with adverse events according to the maximum FDA toxicity grade (mild, moderate, or severe) during the 7 days after each vaccination is plotted for solicited local (Panel A) and systemic (Panel B) adverse events. There were no grade 4 (life-threatening) events. Participants who reported 0 events make up the remainder of the 100% calculation (not displayed).

Excluded were the three sentinel participants in groups C (5 μg + Matrix-M1, 5 μg + Matrix-M1) and D (25 μg + Matrix-M1, 25 μg + Matrix-M1), who received the trial vaccine in an open-label manner (see Table S7 for complete safety data on all participants).Overall reactogenicity was largely absent or mild, and second vaccinations were neither withheld nor delayed due to reactogenicity. After the first vaccination, local and systemic reactogenicity was absent or mild in the majority of participants (local. 100%, 96%, 89%, 84%, and 88% of participants in groups A, B, C, D, and E, respectively.

Systemic. 91%, 92%, 96%, 68%, and 89%) who were unaware of treatment assignment (Figure 2 and Table S7). Two participants (2%), one each in groups D and E, had severe adverse events (headache, fatigue, and malaise).

Two participants, one each in groups A and E, had reactogenicity events (fatigue, malaise, and tenderness) that extended 2 days after day 7. After the second vaccination, local and systemic reactogenicity were absent or mild in the majority of participants in the five groups (local. 100%, 100%, 65%, 67%, and 100% of participants, respectively.

Systemic. 86%, 84%, 73%, 58%, and 96%) who were unaware of treatment assignment. One participant, in group D, had a severe local event (tenderness), and eight participants, one or two participants in each group, had severe systemic events.

The most common severe systemic events were joint pain and fatigue. Only one participant, in group D, had fever (temperature, 38.1°C) after the second vaccination, on day 1 only. No adverse event extended beyond 7 days after the second vaccination.

Of note, the mean duration of reactogenicity events was 2 days or less for both the first vaccination and second vaccination periods. Laboratory abnormalities of grade 2 or higher occurred in 13 participants (10%). 9 after the first vaccination and 4 after the second vaccination (Table S8).

Abnormal laboratory values were not associated with any clinical manifestations and showed no worsening with repeat vaccination. Six participants (5%. Five women and one man) had grade 2 or higher transient reductions in hemoglobin from baseline, with no evidence of hemolysis or microcytic anemia and with resolution within 7 to 21 days.

Of the six, two had an absolute hemoglobin value (grade 2) that resolved or stabilized during the testing period. Four participants (3%), including one who had received placebo, had elevated liver enzymes that were noted after the first vaccination and resolved within 7 to 14 days (i.e., before the second vaccination). Vital signs remained stable immediately after vaccination and at all visits.

Unsolicited adverse events (Table S9) were predominantly mild in severity (in 71%, 91%, 83%, 90%, and 82% of participants in groups A, B, C, D, and E, respectively) and were similarly distributed across the groups receiving adjuvanted and unadjuvanted vaccine. There were no reports of severe adverse events. Immunogenicity Outcomes Figure 3.

Figure 3. SARS-CoV-2 Anti-Spike IgG and Neutralizing Antibody Responses. Shown are geometric mean anti-spike IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) unit responses to recombinant severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (rSARS-CoV-2) protein antigens (Panel A) and wild-type SARS-CoV-2 microneutralization assay at an inhibitory concentration greater than 99% (MN IC>99%) titer responses (Panel B) at baseline (day 0), 3 weeks after the first vaccination (day 21), and 2 weeks after the second vaccination (day 35) for the placebo group (group A), the 25-μg unadjuvanted group (group B), the 5-μg and 25-μg adjuvanted groups (groups C and D, respectively), and the 25-μg adjuvanted and placebo group (group E).

Diamonds and whisker endpoints represent geometric mean titer values and 95% confidence intervals, respectively. The Covid-19 human convalescent serum panel includes specimens from PCR-confirmed Covid-19 participants, obtained from Baylor College of Medicine (29 specimens for ELISA and 32 specimens for MN IC>99%), with geometric mean titer values according to Covid-19 severity. The severity of Covid-19 is indicated by the colors of the dots for hospitalized patients (including those in intensive care), symptomatic outpatients (with samples collected in the emergency department), and asymptomatic patients who had been exposed to Covid-19 (with samples collected during contact and exposure assessment).

Mean values (in black) for human convalescent serum are depicted next to (and of same color as) the category of Covid-19 patients, with the overall mean shown above the scatter plot (in black). For each trial vaccine group, the mean at day 35 is depicted above the scatterplot.ELISA anti-spike IgG geometric mean ELISA units (GMEUs) ranged from 105 to 116 at day 0. By day 21, responses had occurred for all adjuvanted regimens (1984, 2626, and 3317 GMEUs for groups C, D, and E, respectively), and geometric mean fold rises (GMFRs) exceeded those induced without adjuvant by a factor of at least 10 (Figure 3 and Table S10).

Within 7 days after the second vaccination with adjuvant (day 28. Groups C and D), GMEUs had further increased by a factor of 8 (to 15,319 and 20,429, respectively) over responses seen with the first vaccination, and within 14 days (day 35), responses had more than doubled yet again (to 63,160 and 47,521, respectively), achieving GMFRs that were approximately 100 times greater than those observed with rSARS-CoV-2 alone. A single vaccination with adjuvant achieved GMEU levels similar to those in asymptomatic (exposed) patients with Covid-19 (1661), and a second vaccination with adjuvant achieved GMEU levels that exceeded those in convalescent serum from symptomatic outpatients with Covid-19 (7420) by a factor of at least 6 and rose to levels similar to those in convalescent serum from patients hospitalized with Covid-19 (53,391).

The responses in the two-dose 5-μg and 25-μg adjuvanted vaccine regimens were similar, a finding that highlights the role of adjuvant dose sparing. Neutralizing antibodies were undetectable before vaccination and had patterns of response similar to those of anti-spike antibodies after vaccination with adjuvant (Figure 3 and Table S11). After the first vaccination (day 21), GMFRs were approximately 5 times greater with adjuvant (5.2, 6.3, and 5.9 for groups C, D, and E, respectively) than without adjuvant (1.1).

By day 35, second vaccinations with adjuvant induced an increase more than 100 times greater (195 and 165 for groups C and D, respectively) than single vaccinations without adjuvant. When compared with convalescent serum, second vaccinations with adjuvant resulted in GMT levels approximately 4 times greater (3906 and 3305 for groups C and D, respectively) than those in symptomatic outpatients with Covid-19 (837) and approached the magnitude of levels observed in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 (7457). At day 35, ELISA anti-spike IgG GMEUs and neutralizing antibodies induced by the two-dose 5-μg and 25-μg adjuvanted vaccine regimens were 4 to 6 times greater than the geometric mean convalescent serum measures (8344 and 983, respectively).

Figure 4. Figure 4. Correlation of Anti-Spike IgG and Neutralizing Antibody Responses.

Shown are scatter plots of 100% wild-type neutralizing antibody responses and anti-spike IgG ELISA unit responses at 3 weeks after the first vaccination (day 21) and 2 weeks after the second vaccination (day 35) for the two-dose 25-μg unadjuvanted vaccine (group B. Panel A), the combined two-dose 5-μg and 25-μg adjuvanted vaccine (groups C and D, respectively. Panel B), and convalescent serum from patients with Covid-19 (Panel C).

In Panel C, the severity of Covid-19 is indicated by the colors of the dots for hospitalized patients (including those in intensive care), symptomatic outpatients (with samples collected in the emergency department), and asymptomatic patients who had been exposed to Covid-19 (with samples collected during contact and exposure assessment).A strong correlation was observed between neutralizing antibody titers and anti-spike IgG GMEUs with adjuvanted vaccine at day 35 (correlation, 0.95) (Figure 4), a finding that was not observed with unadjuvanted vaccine (correlation, 0.76) but was similar to that of convalescent serum (correlation, 0.96). Two-dose regimens of 5-μg and 25-μg rSARS-CoV-2 plus Matrix-M1 produced similar magnitudes of response, and every participant had seroconversion according to either assay measurement. Reverse cumulative-distribution curves for day 35 are presented in Figure S2.

Figure 5. Figure 5. RSARS-CoV-2 CD4+ T-cell Responses with or without Matrix-M1 Adjuvant.

Frequencies of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells producing T helper 1 (Th1) cytokines interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-2 and for T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines interleukin-5 and interleukin-13 indicated cytokines from four participants each in the placebo (group A), 25-μg unadjuvanted (group B), 5-μg adjuvanted (group C), and 25-μg adjuvanted (group D) groups at baseline (day 0) and 1 week after the second vaccination (day 28) after stimulation with the recombinant spike protein. €œAny 2Th1” indicates CD4+ T cells that can produce two types of Th1 cytokines at the same time. €œAll 3 Th1” indicates CD4+ T cells that produce IFN-γ, TNF-α, and interleukin-2 simultaneously.

€œBoth Th2” indicates CD4+ T cells that can produce Th2 cytokines interleukin-5 and interleukin-13 at the same time.T-cell responses in 16 participants who were randomly selected from groups A through D, 4 participants per group, showed that adjuvanted regimens induced antigen-specific polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses that were reflected in IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α production on spike protein stimulation. A strong bias toward this Th1 phenotype was noted. Th2 responses (as measured by IL-5 and IL-13 cytokines) were minimal (Figure 5).Start Preamble Centers for Medicare &.

Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. Extension of timeline for publication of final rule. This notice announces an extension of the timeline for publication of a Medicare final rule in accordance with the Social Security Act, which allows us to extend the timeline for publication of the final rule.

As of August 26, 2020, the timeline for publication of the final rule to finalize the provisions of the October 17, 2019 proposed rule (84 FR 55766) is extended until August 31, 2021. Start Further Info Lisa O. Wilson, (410) 786-8852.

End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information In the October 17, 2019 Federal Register (84 FR 55766), we published a proposed rule that addressed undue regulatory impact and burden of the physician self-referral law. The proposed rule was issued in conjunction with the Centers for Medicare &. Medicaid Services' (CMS) Patients over Paperwork initiative and the Department of Health and Human Services' (the Department or HHS) Regulatory Sprint to Coordinated Care.

In the proposed rule, we proposed exceptions to the physician self-referral law for certain value-based compensation arrangements between or among physicians, providers, and suppliers. A new exception for certain arrangements under which a physician receives limited remuneration for items or services actually provided by the physician. A new exception for donations of cybersecurity technology and related services.

And amendments to the existing exception for electronic health records (EHR) items and services. The proposed rule also provides critically necessary guidance for physicians and health care providers and suppliers whose financial relationships are governed by the physician self-referral statute and regulations. This notice announces an extension of the timeline for publication of the final rule and the continuation of effectiveness of the proposed rule.

Section 1871(a)(3)(A) of the Social Security Act (the Act) requires us to establish and publish a regular timeline for the publication of final regulations based on the previous publication of a proposed regulation. In accordance with section 1871(a)(3)(B) of the Act, the timeline may vary among different regulations based on differences in the complexity of the regulation, the number and scope of comments received, and other relevant factors, but may not be longer than 3 years except under exceptional circumstances. In addition, in accordance with section 1871(a)(3)(B) of the Act, the Secretary may extend the initial targeted publication date of the final regulation if the Secretary, no later than the regulation's previously established proposed publication date, publishes a notice with the new target date, and such notice includes a brief explanation of the justification for the variation.

We announced in the Spring 2020 Unified Agenda (June 30, 2020, www.reginfo.gov) that we would issue the final rule in August 2020. However, we are still working through the Start Printed Page 52941complexity of the issues raised by comments received on the proposed rule and therefore we are not able to meet the announced publication target date. This notice extends the timeline for publication of the final rule until August 31, 2021.

Start Signature Dated. August 24, 2020. Wilma M.

Robinson, Deputy Executive Secretary to the Department, Department of Health and Human Services. End Signature End Supplemental Information [FR Doc. 2020-18867 Filed 8-26-20.

8:45 am]BILLING CODE 4120-01-PStart Preamble Notice of amendment. The Secretary issues this amendment pursuant to section 319F-3 of the Public Health Service Act to add additional categories of Qualified Persons and amend the category of disease, health condition, or threat for which he recommends the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures. This amendment to the Declaration published on March 17, 2020 (85 FR 15198) is effective as of August 24, 2020.

Start Further Info Robert P. Kadlec, MD, MTM&H, MS, Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, Office of the Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20201. Telephone.

202-205-2882. End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information The Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act (PREP Act) authorizes the Secretary of Health and Human Services (the Secretary) to issue a Declaration to provide liability immunity to certain individuals and entities (Covered Persons) against any claim of loss caused by, arising out of, relating to, or resulting from the manufacture, distribution, administration, or use of medical countermeasures (Covered Countermeasures), except for claims involving “willful misconduct” as defined in the PREP Act. Under the PREP Act, a Declaration may be amended as circumstances warrant.

The PREP Act was enacted on December 30, 2005, as Public Law 109-148, Division C, § 2. It amended the Public Health Service (PHS) Act, adding section 319F-3, which addresses liability immunity, and section 319F-4, which creates a compensation program. These sections are codified at 42 U.S.C.

247d-6d and 42 U.S.C. 247d-6e, respectively. Section 319F-3 of the PHS Act has been amended by the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Reauthorization Act (PAHPRA), Public Law 113-5, enacted on March 13, 2013 and the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, Public Law 116-136, enacted on March 27, Start Printed Page 521372020, to expand Covered Countermeasures under the PREP Act.

On January 31, 2020, the Secretary declared a public health emergency pursuant to section 319 of the PHS Act, 42 U.S.C. 247d, effective January 27, 2020, for the entire United States to aid in the response of the nation's health care community to the COVID-19 outbreak. Pursuant to section 319 of the PHS Act, the Secretary renewed that declaration on April 26, 2020, and July 25, 2020.

On March 10, 2020, the Secretary issued a Declaration under the PREP Act for medical countermeasures against COVID-19 (85 FR 15198, Mar. 17, 2020) (the Declaration). On April 10, the Secretary amended the Declaration under the PREP Act to extend liability immunity to covered countermeasures authorized under the CARES Act (85 FR 21012, Apr.

15, 2020). On June 4, the Secretary amended the Declaration to clarify that covered countermeasures under the Declaration include qualified countermeasures that limit the harm COVID-19 might otherwise cause. The Secretary now amends section V of the Declaration to identify as qualified persons covered under the PREP Act, and thus authorizes, certain State-licensed pharmacists to order and administer, and pharmacy interns (who are licensed or registered by their State board of pharmacy and acting under the supervision of a State-licensed pharmacist) to administer, any vaccine that the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends to persons ages three through 18 according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule (ACIP-recommended vaccines).[] The Secretary also amends section VIII of the Declaration to clarify that the category of disease, health condition, or threat for which he recommends the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures includes not only COVID-19 caused by SARS-CoV-2 or a virus mutating therefrom, but also other diseases, health conditions, or threats that may have been caused by COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, or a virus mutating therefrom, including the decrease in the rate of childhood immunizations, which will lead to an increase in the rate of infectious diseases.

Description of This Amendment by Section Section V. Covered Persons Under the PREP Act and the Declaration, a “qualified person” is a “covered person.” Subject to certain limitations, a covered person is immune from suit and liability under Federal and State law with respect to all claims for loss caused by, arising out of, relating to, or resulting from the administration or use of a covered countermeasure if a declaration under subsection (b) has been issued with respect to such countermeasure. €œQualified person” includes (A) a licensed health professional or other individual who is authorized to prescribe, administer, or dispense such countermeasures under the law of the State in which the countermeasure was prescribed, administered, or dispensed.

Or (B) “a person within a category of persons so identified in a declaration by the Secretary” under subsection (b) of the PREP Act. 42 U.S.C. 247d-6d(i)(8).[] By this amendment to the Declaration, the Secretary identifies an additional category of persons who are qualified persons under section 247d-6d(i)(8)(B).[] On May 8, 2020, CDC reported, “The identified declines in routine pediatric vaccine ordering and doses administered might indicate that U.S.

Children and their communities face increased risks for outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases,” and suggested that a decrease in rates of routine childhood vaccinations were due to changes in healthcare access, social distancing, and other COVID-19 mitigation strategies.[] The report also stated that “[p]arental concerns about potentially exposing their children to COVID-19 during well child visits might contribute to the declines observed.” [] On July 10, 2020, CDC reported its findings of a May survey it conducted to assess the capacity of pediatric health care practices to provide immunization services to children during the COVID-19 pandemic. The survey, which was limited to practices participating in the Vaccines for Children program, found that, as of mid-May, 15 percent of Northeast pediatric practices were closed, 12.5 percent of Midwest practices were closed, 6.2 percent of practices in the South were closed, and 10 percent of practices in the West were closed. Most practices had reduced office hours for in-person visits.

When asked whether their practices would likely be able to accommodate new patients for immunization services through August, 418 practices (21.3 percent) either responded that this was not likely or the practice was permanently closed or not resuming immunization services for all patients, and 380 (19.6 percent) responded that they were unsure. Urban practices and those in the Northeast were less likely to be able to accommodate new patients compared with rural practices and those in the South, Midwest, or West.[] In response to these troubling developments, CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics have stressed, “Well-child visits and vaccinations are essential services and help make sure children are protected.” [] The Secretary re-emphasizes that important recommendation to parents and legal guardians here. If your child is due for a well-child visit, contact your pediatrician's or other primary-care provider's office and ask about ways that the office safely offers well-child visits and vaccinations.

Many medical offices are taking extra steps to make sure that well-child visits can occur safely during the COVID-19 pandemic, including. Scheduling sick visits and well-child visits during different times of the Start Printed Page 52138day or days of the week, or at different locations. Asking patients to remain outside until it is time for their appointments to reduce the number of people in waiting rooms.

Adhering to recommended social (physical) distancing and other infection-control practices, such as the use of masks. The decrease in childhood-vaccination rates is a public health threat and a collateral harm caused by COVID-19. Together, the United States must turn to available medical professionals to limit the harm and public health threats that may result from decreased immunization rates.

We must quickly do so to avoid preventable infections in children, additional strains on our healthcare system, and any further increase in avoidable adverse health consequences—particularly if such complications coincide with additional resurgence of COVID-19. Together with pediatricians and other healthcare professionals, pharmacists are positioned to expand access to childhood vaccinations. Many States already allow pharmacists to administer vaccines to children of any age.[] Other States permit pharmacists to administer vaccines to children depending on the age—for example, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, or 12 years of age and older.[] Few States restrict pharmacist-administered vaccinations to only adults.[] Many States also allow properly trained individuals under the supervision of a trained pharmacist to administer those vaccines.[] Pharmacists are well positioned to increase access to vaccinations, particularly in certain areas or for certain populations that have too few pediatricians and other primary-care providers, or that are otherwise medically underserved.[] As of 2018, nearly 90 percent of Americans lived within five miles of a community pharmacy.[] Pharmacies often offer extended hours and added convenience.

What is more, pharmacists are trusted healthcare professionals with established relationships with their patients. Pharmacists also have strong relationships with local medical providers and hospitals to refer patients as appropriate. For example, pharmacists already play a significant role in annual influenza vaccination.

In the early 2018-19 season, they administered the influenza vaccine to nearly a third of all adults who received the vaccine.[] Given the potential danger of serious influenza and continuing COVID-19 outbreaks this autumn and the impact that such concurrent outbreaks may have on our population, our healthcare system, and our whole-of-nation response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we must quickly expand access to influenza vaccinations. Allowing more qualified pharmacists to administer the influenza vaccine to children will make vaccinations more accessible. Therefore, the Secretary amends the Declaration to identify State-licensed pharmacists (and pharmacy interns acting under their supervision if the pharmacy intern is licensed or registered by his or her State board of pharmacy) as qualified persons under section 247d-6d(i)(8)(B) when the pharmacist orders and either the pharmacist or the supervised pharmacy intern administers vaccines to individuals ages three through 18 pursuant to the following requirements.

The vaccine must be FDA-authorized or FDA-approved. The vaccination must be ordered and administered according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule.[] The licensed pharmacist must complete a practical training program of at least 20 hours that is approved by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE). This training Start Printed Page 52139program must include hands-on injection technique, clinical evaluation of indications and contraindications of vaccines, and the recognition and treatment of emergency reactions to vaccines.[] The licensed or registered pharmacy intern must complete a practical training program that is approved by the ACPE.

This training program must include hands-on injection technique, clinical evaluation of indications and contraindications of vaccines, and the recognition and treatment of emergency reactions to vaccines.[] The licensed pharmacist and licensed or registered pharmacy intern must have a current certificate in basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation.[] The licensed pharmacist must complete a minimum of two hours of ACPE-approved, immunization-related continuing pharmacy education during each State licensing period.[] The licensed pharmacist must comply with recordkeeping and reporting requirements of the jurisdiction in which he or she administers vaccines, including informing the patient's primary-care provider when available, submitting the required immunization information to the State or local immunization information system (vaccine registry), complying with requirements with respect to reporting adverse events, and complying with requirements whereby the person administering a vaccine must review the vaccine registry or other vaccination records prior to administering a vaccine.[] The licensed pharmacist must inform his or her childhood-vaccination patients and the adult caregivers accompanying the children of the importance of a well-child visit with a pediatrician or other licensed primary-care provider and refer patients as appropriate.[] These requirements are consistent with those in many States that permit licensed pharmacists to order and administer vaccines to children and permit licensed or registered pharmacy interns acting under their supervision to administer vaccines to children.[] Administering vaccinations to children age three and older is less complicated and requires less training and resources than administering vaccinations to younger children. That is because ACIP generally recommends administering intramuscular injections in the deltoid muscle for individuals age three and older.[] For individuals less than three years of age, ACIP generally recommends administering intramuscular injections in the anterolateral aspect of the thigh muscle.[] Administering injections in the thigh muscle often presents additional complexities and requires additional training and resources including additional personnel to safely position the child while another healthcare professional injects the vaccine.[] Moreover, as of 2018, 40% of three-year-olds were enrolled in preprimary programs (i.e. Preschool or kindergarten programs).[] Preprimary programs are beginning in the coming weeks or months, so the Secretary has concluded that it is particularly important for individuals ages three through 18 to receive ACIP-recommended vaccines according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule.

All States require children to be vaccinated against certain communicable diseases as a condition of school attendance. These laws often apply to both public and private schools with identical immunization and exemption provisions.[] As nurseries, preschools, kindergartens, and schools reopen, increased access to childhood vaccinations is essential to ensuring children can return. Notwithstanding any State or local scope-of-practice legal requirements, (1) qualified licensed pharmacists are identified as qualified persons to order and administer ACIP-recommended vaccines and (2) qualified State-licensed or registered pharmacy interns are identified as qualified persons to administer the ACIP-recommended vaccines ordered by their supervising qualified licensed pharmacist.[] Both the PREP Act and the June 4, 2020 Second Amendment to the Declaration define “covered countermeasures” to include qualified pandemic and epidemic products that “limit the harm such pandemic or epidemic might otherwise cause.” [] The troubling decrease in ACIP-recommended childhood vaccinations and the resulting increased risk of associated diseases, adverse health conditions, and other threats are categories of harms otherwise caused by Start Printed Page 52140COVID-19 as set forth in Sections VI and VIII of this Declaration.[] Hence, such vaccinations are “covered countermeasures” under the PREP Act and the June 4, 2020 Second Amendment to the Declaration.

Nothing in this Declaration shall be construed to affect the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, including an injured party's ability to obtain compensation under that program. Covered countermeasures that are subject to the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program authorized under 42 U.S.C. 300aa-10 et seq.

Are covered under this Declaration for the purposes of liability immunity and injury compensation only to the extent that injury compensation is not provided under that Program. All other terms and conditions of the Declaration apply to such covered countermeasures. Section VIII.

Category of Disease, Health Condition, or Threat As discussed, the troubling decrease in ACIP-recommended childhood vaccinations and the resulting increased risk of associated diseases, adverse health conditions, and other threats are categories of harms otherwise caused by COVID-19. The Secretary therefore amends section VIII, which describes the category of disease, health condition, or threat for which he recommends the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures, to clarify that the category of disease, health condition, or threat for which he recommends the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures is not only COVID-19 caused by SARS-CoV-2 or a virus mutating therefrom, but also other diseases, health conditions, or threats that may have been caused by COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, or a virus mutating therefrom, including the decrease in the rate of childhood immunizations, which will lead to an increase in the rate of infectious diseases. Amendments to Declaration Amended Declaration for Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act Coverage for medical countermeasures against COVID-19.

Sections V and VIII of the March 10, 2020 Declaration under the PREP Act for medical countermeasures against COVID-19, as amended April 10, 2020 and June 4, 2020, are further amended pursuant to section 319F-3(b)(4) of the PHS Act as described below. All other sections of the Declaration remain in effect as published at 85 FR 15198 (Mar. 17, 2020) and amended at 85 FR 21012 (Apr.

15, 2020) and 85 FR 35100 (June 8, 2020). 1. Covered Persons, section V, delete in full and replace with.

V. Covered Persons 42 U.S.C. 247d-6d(i)(2), (3), (4), (6), (8)(A) and (B) Covered Persons who are afforded liability immunity under this Declaration are “manufacturers,” “distributors,” “program planners,” “qualified persons,” and their officials, agents, and employees, as those terms are defined in the PREP Act, and the United States.

In addition, I have determined that the following additional persons are qualified persons. (a) Any person authorized in accordance with the public health and medical emergency response of the Authority Having Jurisdiction, as described in Section VII below, to prescribe, administer, deliver, distribute or dispense the Covered Countermeasures, and their officials, agents, employees, contractors and volunteers, following a Declaration of an emergency. (b) any person authorized to prescribe, administer, or dispense the Covered Countermeasures or who is otherwise authorized to perform an activity under an Emergency Use Authorization in accordance with Section 564 of the FD&C Act.

(c) any person authorized to prescribe, administer, or dispense Covered Countermeasures in accordance with Section 564A of the FD&C Act. And (d) a State-licensed pharmacist who orders and administers, and pharmacy interns who administer (if the pharmacy intern acts under the supervision of such pharmacist and the pharmacy intern is licensed or registered by his or her State board of pharmacy), vaccines that the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends to persons ages three through 18 according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule. Such State-licensed pharmacists and the State-licensed or registered interns under their supervision are qualified persons only if the following requirements are met.

The vaccine must be FDA-authorized or FDA-approved. The vaccination must be ordered and administered according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule. The licensed pharmacist must complete a practical training program of at least 20 hours that is approved by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE).

This training program must include hands-on injection technique, clinical evaluation of indications and contraindications of vaccines, and the recognition and treatment of emergency reactions to vaccines. The licensed or registered pharmacy intern must complete a practical training program that is approved by the ACPE. This training program must include hands-on injection technique, clinical evaluation of indications and contraindications of vaccines, and the recognition and treatment of emergency reactions to vaccines.

The licensed pharmacist and licensed or registered pharmacy intern must have a current certificate in basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The licensed pharmacist must complete a minimum of two hours of ACPE-approved, immunization-related continuing pharmacy education during each State licensing period. The licensed pharmacist must comply with recordkeeping and reporting requirements of the jurisdiction in which he or she administers vaccines, including informing the patient's primary-care provider when available, submitting the required immunization information to the State or local immunization information system (vaccine registry), complying with requirements with respect to reporting adverse events, and complying with requirements whereby the person administering a vaccine must review the vaccine registry or other vaccination records prior to administering a vaccine.

The licensed pharmacist must inform his or her childhood-vaccination patients and the adult caregiver accompanying the child of the importance of a well-child visit with a pediatrician or other licensed primary-care provider and refer patients as appropriate. Nothing in this Declaration shall be construed to affect the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, including an injured party's ability to obtain compensation under that program. Covered countermeasures that are subject to the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program authorized under 42 U.S.C.

300aa-10 et seq. Are covered under this Declaration for the purposes of liability immunity and injury compensation only to the extent that injury compensation is not provided under that Program. All other Start Printed Page 52141terms and conditions of the Declaration apply to such covered countermeasures.

2. Category of Disease, Health Condition, or Threat, section VIII, delete in full and replace with. VIII.

Category of Disease, Health Condition, or Threat 42 U.S.C. 247d-6d(b)(2)(A) The category of disease, health condition, or threat for which I recommend the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures is not only COVID-19 caused by SARS-CoV-2 or a virus mutating therefrom, but also other diseases, health conditions, or threats that may have been caused by COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, or a virus mutating therefrom, including the decrease in the rate of childhood immunizations, which will lead to an increase in the rate of infectious diseases. Start Authority 42 U.S.C.

247d-6d. End Authority Start Signature Dated. August 19, 2020.

Alex M. Azar II, Secretary of Health and Human Services. End Signature End Supplemental Information [FR Doc.

2020-18542 Filed 8-20-20. 4:15 pm]BILLING CODE 4150-03-P.

Specificity of SARS-CoV-2 Antibody singulair online purchase Assays Both assays measuring pan-Ig antibodies had low numbers of false positives among samples collected in 2017. There were 0 and 1 false singulair online purchase positives for the two assays among 472 samples, results that compared favorably with those obtained with the single IgM anti-N and IgG anti-N assays (Table S3). Because of the low prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in Iceland, we required positive results from both pan-Ig antibody assays for a sample to be considered seropositive (see Supplementary Methods in Supplementary Appendix 1). None of the samples collected in singulair online purchase early 2020 group were seropositive, which indicates that the virus had not spread widely in Iceland before February 2020.

SARS-CoV-2 Antibodies among qPCR-Positive Persons Figure 2. Figure 2 singulair online purchase. Antibody Prevalence and Titers among qPCR-Positive Cases as a Function of Time since Diagnosis by qPCR. Shown are the percentages of samples positive for both pan-Ig antibody assays and the singulair online purchase antibody titers.

Red denotes the count or percentage of samples among persons during their hospitalization (249 samples from 48 persons), and blue denotes the count or percentage of samples among persons after they were declared recovered (1853 samples from 1215 persons). Vertical bars denote 95% singulair online purchase confidence intervals. The dashed lines indicated the thresholds for a test to be declared positive. OD denotes singulair online purchase optical density, and RBD receptor binding domain.Table 1.

Table 1. Prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 Antibodies by Sample singulair online purchase Collection as Measured by Two Pan-Ig Antibody Assays. Twenty-five days after diagnosis by qPCR, more than 90% of samples from recovered persons tested positive with both pan-Ig singulair online purchase antibody assays, and the percentage of persons testing positive remained stable thereafter (Figure 2 and Fig. S2).

Hospitalized persons seroconverted more frequently and quickly after qPCR diagnosis than did nonhospitalized persons (Figure 2 singulair online purchase and Fig. S3). Of 1215 persons who had recovered (on the basis of results for the most recently obtained sample from singulair online purchase persons for whom we had multiple samples), 1107 were seropositive (91.1%. 95% confidence interval [CI], 89.4 to 92.6) (Table 1 and Table S4).

Since some diagnoses may have been made on the basis of false positive qPCR results, we determined that 91.1% represents the lower bound of sensitivity of the combined pan-Ig tests for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies among singulair online purchase recovered persons. Table 2. Table 2 singulair online purchase. Results of Repeated Pan-Ig Antibody Tests among Recovered qPCR-Diagnosed Persons.

Among the 487 recovered persons with two or singulair online purchase more samples, 19 (4%) had different pan-Ig antibody test results at different time points (Table 2 and Fig. S4). It is notable that of the 22 persons with an early sample that tested negative singulair online purchase for both pan-Ig antibodies, 19 remained negative at the most recent test date (again, for both antibodies). One person tested positive for both pan-Ig antibodies in the first test and negative for both in the most recent test.

The longitudinal changes in antibody levels among recovered persons were consistent singulair online purchase with the cross-sectional results (Fig. S5). Antibody levels were higher in the last sample than in the first sample when the antibodies were measured with the two pan-Ig assays, slightly lower than in the first sample when measured with IgG anti-N and IgG anti-S1 assays, and substantially lower than in the first sample when measured with IgM anti-N and IgA anti-S1 assays. IgG anti-N, IgM anti-N, IgG anti-S1, and IgA anti-S1 antibody levels were correlated among the qPCR-positive persons (Figs.

S5 and S6 and Table S5). Antibody levels measured with both pan-Ig antibody assays increased over the first 2 months after qPCR diagnosis and remained at a plateau over the next 2 months of the study. IgM anti-N antibody levels increased rapidly soon after diagnosis and then fell rapidly and were generally not detected after 2 months. IgA anti-S1 antibodies decreased 1 month after diagnosis and remained detectable thereafter.

IgG anti-N and anti-S1 antibody levels increased during the first 6 weeks after diagnosis and then decreased slightly. SARS-CoV-2 Infection in Quarantine Table 3. Table 3. SARS-CoV-2 Infection among Quarantined Persons According to Exposure Type and Presence of Symptoms.

Of the 1797 qPCR-positive Icelanders, 1088 (61%) were in quarantine when SARS-CoV-2 infection was diagnosed by qPCR. We tested for antibodies among 4222 quarantined persons who had not tested qPCR-positive (they had received a negative result by qPCR or had simply not been tested). Of those 4222 quarantined persons, 97 (2.3%. 95% CI, 1.9 to 2.8) were seropositive (Table 1).

Those with household exposure were 5.2 (95% CI, 3.3 to 8.0) times more likely to be seropositive than those with other types of exposure (Table 3). Similarly, a positive result by qPCR for those with household exposure was 5.2 (95% CI, 4.5 to 6.1) times more likely than for those with other types of exposure. When these two sets of results (qPCR-positive and seropositive) were combined, we calculated that 26.6% of quarantined persons with household exposure and 5.0% of quarantined persons without household exposure were infected. Those who had symptoms during quarantine were 3.2 (95% CI, 1.7 to 6.2) times more likely to be seropositive and 18.2 times (95% CI, 14.8 to 22.4) more likely to test positive with qPCR than those without symptoms.

We also tested persons in two regions of Iceland affected by cluster outbreaks. In a SARS-CoV-2 cluster in Vestfirdir, 1.4% of residents were qPCR-positive and 10% of residents were quarantined. We found that none of the 326 persons outside quarantine who had not been tested by qPCR (or who tested negative) were seropositive. In a cluster in Vestmannaeyjar, 2.3% of residents were qPCR-positive and 13% of residents were quarantined.

Of the 447 quarantined persons who had not received a qPCR-positive result, 4 were seropositive (0.9%. 95% CI, 0.3 to 2.1). Of the 663 outside quarantine in Vestmannaeyjar, 3 were seropositive (0.5%. 95% CI, 0.1 to 0.2%).

SARS-CoV-2 Seroprevalence in Iceland None of the serum samples collected from 470 healthy Icelanders between February 18 and March 9, 2020, tested positive for both pan-Ig antibodies, although four were positive for the pan-Ig anti-N assay (0.9%), a finding that suggests that the virus had not spread widely in Iceland before March 9. Of the 18,609 persons tested for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies through contact with the Icelandic health care system for reasons other than Covid-19, 39 were positive for both pan-Ig antibody assays (estimated seroprevalence by weighting the sample on the basis of residence, sex, and 10-year age category, 0.3%. 95% CI, 0.2 to 0.4). There were regional differences in the percentages of qPCR-positive persons across Iceland that were roughly proportional to the percentage of people quarantined (Table S6).

However, after exclusion of the qPCR-positive and quarantined persons, the percentage of persons who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies did not correlate with the percentage of those who tested positive by qPCR. The estimated seroprevalence in the random sample collection from Reykjavik (0.4%. 95% CI, 0.3 to 0.6) was similar to that in the Health Care group (0.3%. 95% CI, 0.2 to 0.4) (Table S6).

We calculate that 0.5% of the residents of Iceland have tested positive with qPCR. The 2.3% with SARS-CoV-2 seroconversion among persons in quarantine extrapolates to 0.1% of Icelandic residents. On the basis of this finding and the seroprevalence from the Health Care group, we estimate that 0.9% (95% CI, 0.8 to 0.9) of the population of Iceland has been infected by SARS-CoV-2. Approximately 56% of all SARS-CoV-2 infections were therefore diagnosed by qPCR, 14% occurred in quarantine without having been diagnosed with qPCR, and the remaining 30% of infections occurred outside quarantine and were not detected by qPCR.

Deaths from Covid-19 in Iceland In Iceland, 10 deaths have been attributed to Covid-19, which corresponds to 3 deaths per 100,000 nationwide. Among the qPCR-positive cases, 0.6% (95% CI, 0.3 to 1.0) were fatal. Using the 0.9% prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in Iceland as the denominator, however, we calculate an infection fatality risk of 0.3% (95% CI, 0.2 to 0.6). Stratified by age, the infection fatality risk was substantially lower in those 70 years old or younger (0.1%.

95% CI, 0.0 to 0.3) than in those over 70 years of age (4.4%. 95% CI, 1.9 to 8.4) (Table S7). Age, Sex, Clinical Characteristics, and Antibody Levels Table 4. Table 4.

Association of Existing Conditions and Covid-19 Severity with SARS-CoV-2 Antibody Levels among Recovered Persons. SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels were higher in older people and in those who were hospitalized (Table 4, and Table S8 [described in Supplementary Appendix 1 and available in Supplementary Appendix 2]). Pan-Ig anti–S1-RBD and IgA anti-S1 levels were lower in female persons. Of the preexisting conditions, and after adjustment for multiple testing, we found that body-mass index, smoking status, and use of antiinflammatory medication were associated with SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels.

Body-mass index correlated positively with antibody levels. Smokers and users of antiinflammatory medication had lower antibody levels. With respect to clinical characteristics, antibody levels were most strongly associated with hospitalization and clinical severity, followed by clinical symptoms such as fever, maximum temperature reading, cough, and loss of appetite. Severity of these individual symptoms, with the exception of loss of energy, was associated with higher antibody levels.To the Editor.

Rapid and accurate diagnostic tests are essential for controlling the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic. Although the current standard involves testing of nasopharyngeal swab specimens by quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) to detect SARS-CoV-2, saliva specimens may be an alternative diagnostic sample.1-4 Rigorous evaluation is needed to determine how saliva specimens compare with nasopharyngeal swab specimens with respect to sensitivity in detection of SARS-CoV-2 during the course of infection. A total of 70 inpatients with Covid-19 provided written informed consent to participate in our study (see the Methods section in Supplementary Appendix 1, available with the full text of this letter at NEJM.org). After Covid-19 was confirmed with a positive nasopharyngeal swab specimen at hospital admission, we obtained additional samples from the patients during hospitalization.

We tested saliva specimens collected by the patients themselves and nasopharyngeal swabs collected from the patients at the same time point by health care workers. Figure 1. Figure 1. SARS-CoV-2 RNA Titers in Saliva Specimens and Nasopharyngeal Swab Specimens.

Samples were obtained from 70 hospital inpatients who had a diagnosis of Covid-19. Panel A shows SARS-CoV-2 RNA titers in the first available nasopharyngeal and saliva samples. The lines indicate samples from the same patient. Results were compared with the use of a Wilcoxon signed-rank test (P<0.001).

Panel B shows percentages of positivity for SARS-CoV-2 in tests of the first matched nasopharyngeal and saliva samples at 1 to 5 days, 6 to 10 days, and 11 or more days (maximum, 53 days) after the diagnosis of Covid-19. Panel C shows longitudinal SARS-CoV-2 RNA copies per milliliter in 97 saliva samples, according to days since symptom onset. Each circle represents a separate sample. Dashed lines indicate additional samples from the same patient.

The red line indicates a negative saliva sample that was followed by a positive sample at the next collection of a specimen. Panel D shows longitudinal SARS-CoV-2 RNA copies per milliliter in 97 nasopharyngeal swab specimens, according to days since symptom onset. The red lines indicate negative nasopharyngeal swab specimens there were followed by a positive swab at the next collection of a specimen. The gray area in Panels C and D indicates samples that were below the lower limit of detection of 5610 virus RNA copies per milliliter of sample, which is at cycle threshold 38 of our quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay targeting the SARS-CoV-2 N1 sequence recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

To analyze these data, we used a linear mixed-effects regression model (see Supplementary Appendix 1) that accounts for the correlation between samples collected from the same person at a single time point (i.e., multivariate response) and the correlation between samples collected across time from the same patient (i.e., repeated measures). All the data used to generate this figure, including the raw cycle thresholds, are provided in Supplementary Data 1 in Supplementary Appendix 2.Using primer sequences from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we detected more SARS-CoV-2 RNA copies in the saliva specimens (mean log copies per milliliter, 5.58. 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.09 to 6.07) than in the nasopharyngeal swab specimens (mean log copies per milliliter, 4.93. 95% CI, 4.53 to 5.33) (Figure 1A, and Fig.

S1 in Supplementary Appendix 1). In addition, a higher percentage of saliva samples than nasopharyngeal swab samples were positive up to 10 days after the Covid-19 diagnosis (Figure 1B). At 1 to 5 days after diagnosis, 81% (95% CI, 71 to 96) of the saliva samples were positive, as compared with 71% (95% CI, 67 to 94) of the nasopharyngeal swab specimens. These findings suggest that saliva specimens and nasopharyngeal swab specimens have at least similar sensitivity in the detection of SARS-CoV-2 during the course of hospitalization.

Because the results of testing of nasopharyngeal swab specimens to detect SARS-CoV-2 may vary with repeated sampling in individual patients,5 we evaluated viral detection in matched samples over time. The level of SARS-CoV-2 RNA decreased after symptom onset in both saliva specimens (estimated slope, −0.11. 95% credible interval, −0.15 to −0.06) (Figure 1C) and nasopharyngeal swab specimens (estimated slope, −0.09. 95% credible interval, −0.13 to −0.05) (Figure 1D).

In three instances, a negative nasopharyngeal swab specimen was followed by a positive swab at the next collection of a specimen (Figure 1D). This phenomenon occurred only once with the saliva specimens (Figure 1C). During the clinical course, we observed less variation in levels of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the saliva specimens (standard deviation, 0.98 virus RNA copies per milliliter. 95% credible interval, 0.08 to 1.98) than in the nasopharyngeal swab specimens (standard deviation, 2.01 virus RNA copies per milliliter.

95% credible interval, 1.29 to 2.70) (see Supplementary Appendix 1). Recent studies have shown that SARS-CoV-2 can be detected in the saliva of asymptomatic persons and outpatients.1-3 We therefore screened 495 asymptomatic health care workers who provided written informed consent to participate in our prospective study, and we used RT-qPCR to test both saliva and nasopharyngeal samples obtained from these persons. We detected SARS-CoV-2 RNA in saliva specimens obtained from 13 persons who did not report any symptoms at or before the time of sample collection. Of these 13 health care workers, 9 had collected matched nasopharyngeal swab specimens by themselves on the same day, and 7 of these specimens tested negative (Fig.

S2). The diagnosis in the 13 health care workers with positive saliva specimens was later confirmed in diagnostic testing of additional nasopharyngeal samples by a CLIA (Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988)–certified laboratory. Variation in nasopharyngeal sampling may be an explanation for false negative results, so monitoring an internal control for proper sample collection may provide an alternative evaluation technique. In specimens collected from inpatients by health care workers, we found greater variation in human RNase P cycle threshold (Ct) values in nasopharyngeal swab specimens (standard deviation, 2.89 Ct.

95% CI, 26.53 to 27.69) than in saliva specimens (standard deviation, 2.49 Ct. 95% CI, 23.35 to 24.35). When health care workers collected their own specimens, we also found greater variation in RNase P Ct values in nasopharyngeal swab specimens (standard deviation, 2.26 Ct. 95% CI, 28.39 to 28.56) than in saliva specimens (standard deviation , 1.65 Ct.

95% CI, 24.14 to 24.26) (Fig. S3). Collection of saliva samples by patients themselves negates the need for direct interaction between health care workers and patients. This interaction is a source of major testing bottlenecks and presents a risk of nosocomial infection.

Collection of saliva samples by patients themselves also alleviates demands for supplies of swabs and personal protective equipment. Given the growing need for testing, our findings provide support for the potential of saliva specimens in the diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Anne L. Wyllie, Ph.D.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT [email protected]John Fournier, M.D.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTArnau Casanovas-Massana, Ph.D.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CTMelissa Campbell, M.D.Maria Tokuyama, Ph.D.Pavithra Vijayakumar, B.A.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTJoshua L.

Warren, Ph.D.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CTBertie Geng, M.D.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTM. Catherine Muenker, M.S.Adam J. Moore, M.P.H.Chantal B.F. Vogels, Ph.D.Mary E.

Petrone, B.S.Isabel M. Ott, B.S.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CTPeiwen Lu, Ph.D.Arvind Venkataraman, B.S.Alice Lu-Culligan, B.S.Jonathan Klein, B.S.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTRebecca Earnest, M.P.H.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CTMichael Simonov, M.D.Rupak Datta, M.D., Ph.D.Ryan Handoko, M.D.Nida Naushad, B.S.Lorenzo R. Sewanan, M.Phil.Jordan Valdez, B.S.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTElizabeth B. White, A.B.Sarah Lapidus, M.S.Chaney C.

Kalinich, M.P.H.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CTXiaodong Jiang, M.D., Ph.D.Daniel J. Kim, A.B.Eriko Kudo, Ph.D.Melissa Linehan, M.S.Tianyang Mao, B.S.Miyu Moriyama, Ph.D.Ji E. Oh, M.D., Ph.D.Annsea Park, B.A.Julio Silva, B.S.Eric Song, M.S.Takehiro Takahashi, M.D., Ph.D.Manabu Taura, Ph.D.Orr-El Weizman, B.A.Patrick Wong, M.S.Yexin Yang, B.S.Santos Bermejo, B.S.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTCamila D. Odio, M.D.Yale New Haven Health, New Haven, CTSaad B.

Omer, M.B., B.S., Ph.D.Yale Institute for Global Health, New Haven, CTCharles S. Dela Cruz, M.D., Ph.D.Shelli Farhadian, M.D., Ph.D.Richard A. Martinello, M.D.Akiko Iwasaki, Ph.D.Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CTNathan D. Grubaugh, Ph.D.Albert I.

Ko, M.D.Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT [email protected], [email protected] Supported by the Huffman Family Donor Advised Fund, a Fast Grant from Emergent Ventures at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, the Yale Institute for Global Health, the Yale School of Medicine, a grant (U19 AI08992, to Dr. Ko) from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the Beatrice Kleinberg Neuwirth Fund, and a grant (Rubicon 019.181EN.004, to Dr. Vogel) from the Dutch Research Council (NWO). Disclosure forms provided by the authors are available with the full text of this letter at NEJM.org.

This letter was published on August 28, 2020, at NEJM.org. Drs. Grubaugh and Ko contributed equally to this letter. 5 References1.

Kojima N, Turner F, Slepnev V, et al. Self-collected oral fluid and nasal swabs demonstrate comparable sensitivity to clinician collected nasopharyngeal swabs for Covid-19 detection. April 15, 2020 (https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.04.11.20062372v1). Preprint.Google Scholar2.

Williams E, Bond K, Zhang B, Putland M, Williamson DA. Saliva as a non-invasive specimen for detection of SARS-CoV-2. J Clin Microbiol 2020;58(8):e00776-20-e00776-20.3. Pasomsub E, Watcharananan SP, Boonyawat K, et al.

Saliva sample as a non-invasive specimen for the diagnosis of coronavirus disease 2019. A cross-sectional study. Clin Microbiol Infect 2020 May 15 (Epub ahead of print).4. Vogels CBF, Brackney D, Wang J, et al.

SalivaDirect. Simple and sensitive molecular diagnostic test for SARS-CoV-2 surveillance. August 4, 2020 (https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.08.03.20167791v1). Preprint.Google Scholar5.

Zou L, Ruan F, Huang M, et al. SARS-CoV-2 viral load in upper respiratory specimens of infected patients. N Engl J Med 2020;382:1177-1179.Trial Population Table 1. Table 1.

Demographic Characteristics of the Participants in the NVX-CoV2373 Trial at Enrollment. The trial was initiated on May 26, 2020. 134 participants underwent randomization between May 27 and June 6, 2020, including 3 participants who were to serve as backups for sentinel dosing and who immediately withdrew from the trial without being vaccinated (Fig. S1).

Of the 131 participants who received injections, 23 received placebo (group A), 25 received 25-μg doses of rSARS-CoV-2 (group B), 29 received 5-μg doses of rSARS-CoV-2 plus Matrix-M1, including three sentinels (group C), 28 received 25-μg doses of rSARS-CoV-2 plus Matrix-M1, including three sentinels (group D), and 26 received a single 25-μg dose of rSARS-CoV-2 plus Matrix-M1 followed by a single dose of placebo (group E). All 131 participants received their first vaccination on day 0, and all but 3 received their second vaccination at least 21 days later. Exceptions include 2 in the placebo group (group A) who withdrew consent (unrelated to any adverse event) and 1 in the 25-μg rSARS-CoV-2 + Matrix-M1 group (group D) who had an unsolicited adverse event (mild cellulitis. See below).

Demographic characteristics of the participants are presented in Table 1. Of note, missing data were infrequent. Safety Outcomes No serious adverse events or adverse events of special interest were reported, and vaccination pause rules were not implemented. As noted above, one participant did not receive a second vaccination owing to an unsolicited adverse event, mild cellulitis, that was associated with infection after an intravenous cannula placement to address an unrelated mild adverse event that occurred during the second week of follow-up.

Second vaccination was withheld because the participant was still recovering and receiving antibiotics. This participant remains in the trial. Figure 2. Figure 2.

Solicited Local and Systemic Adverse Events. The percentage of participants in each vaccine group (groups A, B, C, D, and E) with adverse events according to the maximum FDA toxicity grade (mild, moderate, or severe) during the 7 days after each vaccination is plotted for solicited local (Panel A) and systemic (Panel B) adverse events. There were no grade 4 (life-threatening) events. Participants who reported 0 events make up the remainder of the 100% calculation (not displayed).

Excluded were the three sentinel participants in groups C (5 μg + Matrix-M1, 5 μg + Matrix-M1) and D (25 μg + Matrix-M1, 25 μg + Matrix-M1), who received the trial vaccine in an open-label manner (see Table S7 for complete safety data on all participants).Overall reactogenicity was largely absent or mild, and second vaccinations were neither withheld nor delayed due to reactogenicity. After the first vaccination, local and systemic reactogenicity was absent or mild in the majority of participants (local. 100%, 96%, 89%, 84%, and 88% of participants in groups A, B, C, D, and E, respectively. Systemic.

91%, 92%, 96%, 68%, and 89%) who were unaware of treatment assignment (Figure 2 and Table S7). Two participants (2%), one each in groups D and E, had severe adverse events (headache, fatigue, and malaise). Two participants, one each in groups A and E, had reactogenicity events (fatigue, malaise, and tenderness) that extended 2 days after day 7. After the second vaccination, local and systemic reactogenicity were absent or mild in the majority of participants in the five groups (local.

100%, 100%, 65%, 67%, and 100% of participants, respectively. Systemic. 86%, 84%, 73%, 58%, and 96%) who were unaware of treatment assignment. One participant, in group D, had a severe local event (tenderness), and eight participants, one or two participants in each group, had severe systemic events.

The most common severe systemic events were joint pain and fatigue. Only one participant, in group D, had fever (temperature, 38.1°C) after the second vaccination, on day 1 only. No adverse event extended beyond 7 days after the second vaccination. Of note, the mean duration of reactogenicity events was 2 days or less for both the first vaccination and second vaccination periods.

Laboratory abnormalities of grade 2 or higher occurred in 13 participants (10%). 9 after the first vaccination and 4 after the second vaccination (Table S8). Abnormal laboratory values were not associated with any clinical manifestations and showed no worsening with repeat vaccination. Six participants (5%.

Five women and one man) had grade 2 or higher transient reductions in hemoglobin from baseline, with no evidence of hemolysis or microcytic anemia and with resolution within 7 to 21 days. Of the six, two had an absolute hemoglobin value (grade 2) that resolved or stabilized during the testing period. Four participants (3%), including one who had received placebo, had elevated liver enzymes that were noted after the first vaccination and resolved within 7 to 14 days (i.e., before the second vaccination). Vital signs remained stable immediately after vaccination and at all visits.

Unsolicited adverse events (Table S9) were predominantly mild in severity (in 71%, 91%, 83%, 90%, and 82% of participants in groups A, B, C, D, and E, respectively) and were similarly distributed across the groups receiving adjuvanted and unadjuvanted vaccine. There were no reports of severe adverse events. Immunogenicity Outcomes Figure 3. Figure 3.

SARS-CoV-2 Anti-Spike IgG and Neutralizing Antibody Responses. Shown are geometric mean anti-spike IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) unit responses to recombinant severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (rSARS-CoV-2) protein antigens (Panel A) and wild-type SARS-CoV-2 microneutralization assay at an inhibitory concentration greater than 99% (MN IC>99%) titer responses (Panel B) at baseline (day 0), 3 weeks after the first vaccination (day 21), and 2 weeks after the second vaccination (day 35) for the placebo group (group A), the 25-μg unadjuvanted group (group B), the 5-μg and 25-μg adjuvanted groups (groups C and D, respectively), and the 25-μg adjuvanted and placebo group (group E). Diamonds and whisker endpoints represent geometric mean titer values and 95% confidence intervals, respectively. The Covid-19 human convalescent serum panel includes specimens from PCR-confirmed Covid-19 participants, obtained from Baylor College of Medicine (29 specimens for ELISA and 32 specimens for MN IC>99%), with geometric mean titer values according to Covid-19 severity.

The severity of Covid-19 is indicated by the colors of the dots for hospitalized patients (including those in intensive care), symptomatic outpatients (with samples collected in the emergency department), and asymptomatic patients who had been exposed to Covid-19 (with samples collected during contact and exposure assessment). Mean values (in black) for human convalescent serum are depicted next to (and of same color as) the category of Covid-19 patients, with the overall mean shown above the scatter plot (in black). For each trial vaccine group, the mean at day 35 is depicted above the scatterplot.ELISA anti-spike IgG geometric mean ELISA units (GMEUs) ranged from 105 to 116 at day 0. By day 21, responses had occurred for all adjuvanted regimens (1984, 2626, and 3317 GMEUs for groups C, D, and E, respectively), and geometric mean fold rises (GMFRs) exceeded those induced without adjuvant by a factor of at least 10 (Figure 3 and Table S10).

Within 7 days after the second vaccination with adjuvant (day 28. Groups C and D), GMEUs had further increased by a factor of 8 (to 15,319 and 20,429, respectively) over responses seen with the first vaccination, and within 14 days (day 35), responses had more than doubled yet again (to 63,160 and 47,521, respectively), achieving GMFRs that were approximately 100 times greater than those observed with rSARS-CoV-2 alone. A single vaccination with adjuvant achieved GMEU levels similar to those in asymptomatic (exposed) patients with Covid-19 (1661), and a second vaccination with adjuvant achieved GMEU levels that exceeded those in convalescent serum from symptomatic outpatients with Covid-19 (7420) by a factor of at least 6 and rose to levels similar to those in convalescent serum from patients hospitalized with Covid-19 (53,391). The responses in the two-dose 5-μg and 25-μg adjuvanted vaccine regimens were similar, a finding that highlights the role of adjuvant dose sparing.

Neutralizing antibodies were undetectable before vaccination and had patterns of response similar to those of anti-spike antibodies after vaccination with adjuvant (Figure 3 and Table S11). After the first vaccination (day 21), GMFRs were approximately 5 times greater with adjuvant (5.2, 6.3, and 5.9 for groups C, D, and E, respectively) than without adjuvant (1.1). By day 35, second vaccinations with adjuvant induced an increase more than 100 times greater (195 and 165 for groups C and D, respectively) than single vaccinations without adjuvant. When compared with convalescent serum, second vaccinations with adjuvant resulted in GMT levels approximately 4 times greater (3906 and 3305 for groups C and D, respectively) than those in symptomatic outpatients with Covid-19 (837) and approached the magnitude of levels observed in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 (7457).

At day 35, ELISA anti-spike IgG GMEUs and neutralizing antibodies induced by the two-dose 5-μg and 25-μg adjuvanted vaccine regimens were 4 to 6 times greater than the geometric mean convalescent serum measures (8344 and 983, respectively). Figure 4. Figure 4. Correlation of Anti-Spike IgG and Neutralizing Antibody Responses.

Shown are scatter plots of 100% wild-type neutralizing antibody responses and anti-spike IgG ELISA unit responses at 3 weeks after the first vaccination (day 21) and 2 weeks after the second vaccination (day 35) for the two-dose 25-μg unadjuvanted vaccine (group B. Panel A), the combined two-dose 5-μg and 25-μg adjuvanted vaccine (groups C and D, respectively. Panel B), and convalescent serum from patients with Covid-19 (Panel C). In Panel C, the severity of Covid-19 is indicated by the colors of the dots for hospitalized patients (including those in intensive care), symptomatic outpatients (with samples collected in the emergency department), and asymptomatic patients who had been exposed to Covid-19 (with samples collected during contact and exposure assessment).A strong correlation was observed between neutralizing antibody titers and anti-spike IgG GMEUs with adjuvanted vaccine at day 35 (correlation, 0.95) (Figure 4), a finding that was not observed with unadjuvanted vaccine (correlation, 0.76) but was similar to that of convalescent serum (correlation, 0.96).

Two-dose regimens of 5-μg and 25-μg rSARS-CoV-2 plus Matrix-M1 produced similar magnitudes of response, and every participant had seroconversion according to either assay measurement. Reverse cumulative-distribution curves for day 35 are presented in Figure S2. Figure 5. Figure 5.

RSARS-CoV-2 CD4+ T-cell Responses with or without Matrix-M1 Adjuvant. Frequencies of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells producing T helper 1 (Th1) cytokines interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-2 and for T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines interleukin-5 and interleukin-13 indicated cytokines from four participants each in the placebo (group A), 25-μg unadjuvanted (group B), 5-μg adjuvanted (group C), and 25-μg adjuvanted (group D) groups at baseline (day 0) and 1 week after the second vaccination (day 28) after stimulation with the recombinant spike protein. €œAny 2Th1” indicates CD4+ T cells that can produce two types of Th1 cytokines at the same time. €œAll 3 Th1” indicates CD4+ T cells that produce IFN-γ, TNF-α, and interleukin-2 simultaneously.

€œBoth Th2” indicates CD4+ T cells that can produce Th2 cytokines interleukin-5 and interleukin-13 at the same time.T-cell responses in 16 participants who were randomly selected from groups A through D, 4 participants per group, showed that adjuvanted regimens induced antigen-specific polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses that were reflected in IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α production on spike protein stimulation. A strong bias toward this Th1 phenotype was noted. Th2 responses (as measured by IL-5 and IL-13 cytokines) were minimal (Figure 5).Start Preamble Centers for Medicare &. Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS.

Extension of timeline for publication of final rule. This notice announces an extension of the timeline for publication of a Medicare final rule in accordance with the Social Security Act, which allows us to extend the timeline for publication of the final rule. As of August 26, 2020, the timeline for publication of the final rule to finalize the provisions of the October 17, 2019 proposed rule (84 FR 55766) is extended until August 31, 2021. Start Further Info Lisa O.

Wilson, (410) 786-8852. End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information In the October 17, 2019 Federal Register (84 FR 55766), we published a proposed rule that addressed undue regulatory impact and burden of the physician self-referral law. The proposed rule was issued in conjunction with the Centers for Medicare &. Medicaid Services' (CMS) Patients over Paperwork initiative and the Department of Health and Human Services' (the Department or HHS) Regulatory Sprint to Coordinated Care.

In the proposed rule, we proposed exceptions to the physician self-referral law for certain value-based compensation arrangements between or among physicians, providers, and suppliers. A new exception for certain arrangements under which a physician receives limited remuneration for items or services actually provided by the physician. A new exception for donations of cybersecurity technology and related services. And amendments to the existing exception for electronic health records (EHR) items and services.

The proposed rule also provides critically necessary guidance for physicians and health care providers and suppliers whose financial relationships are governed by the physician self-referral statute and regulations. This notice announces an extension of the timeline for publication of the final rule and the continuation of effectiveness of the proposed rule. Section 1871(a)(3)(A) of the Social Security Act (the Act) requires us to establish and publish a regular timeline for the publication of final regulations based on the previous publication of a proposed regulation. In accordance with section 1871(a)(3)(B) of the Act, the timeline may vary among different regulations based on differences in the complexity of the regulation, the number and scope of comments received, and other relevant factors, but may not be longer than 3 years except under exceptional circumstances.

In addition, in accordance with section 1871(a)(3)(B) of the Act, the Secretary may extend the initial targeted publication date of the final regulation if the Secretary, no later than the regulation's previously established proposed publication date, publishes a notice with the new target date, and such notice includes a brief explanation of the justification for the variation. We announced in the Spring 2020 Unified Agenda (June 30, 2020, www.reginfo.gov) that we would issue the final rule in August 2020. However, we are still working through the Start Printed Page 52941complexity of the issues raised by comments received on the proposed rule and therefore we are not able to meet the announced publication target date. This notice extends the timeline for publication of the final rule until August 31, 2021.

Start Signature Dated. August 24, 2020. Wilma M. Robinson, Deputy Executive Secretary to the Department, Department of Health and Human Services.

End Signature End Supplemental Information [FR Doc. 2020-18867 Filed 8-26-20. 8:45 am]BILLING CODE 4120-01-PStart Preamble Notice of amendment. The Secretary issues this amendment pursuant to section 319F-3 of the Public Health Service Act to add additional categories of Qualified Persons and amend the category of disease, health condition, or threat for which he recommends the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures.

This amendment to the Declaration published on March 17, 2020 (85 FR 15198) is effective as of August 24, 2020. Start Further Info Robert P. Kadlec, MD, MTM&H, MS, Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, Office of the Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20201. Telephone.

202-205-2882. End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information The Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act (PREP Act) authorizes the Secretary of Health and Human Services (the Secretary) to issue a Declaration to provide liability immunity to certain individuals and entities (Covered Persons) against any claim of loss caused by, arising out of, relating to, or resulting from the manufacture, distribution, administration, or use of medical countermeasures (Covered Countermeasures), except for claims involving “willful misconduct” as defined in the PREP Act. Under the PREP Act, a Declaration may be amended as circumstances warrant. The PREP Act was enacted on December 30, 2005, as Public Law 109-148, Division C, § 2.

It amended the Public Health Service (PHS) Act, adding section 319F-3, which addresses liability immunity, and section 319F-4, which creates a compensation program. These sections are codified at 42 U.S.C. 247d-6d and 42 U.S.C. 247d-6e, respectively.

Section 319F-3 of the PHS Act has been amended by the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Reauthorization Act (PAHPRA), Public Law 113-5, enacted on March 13, 2013 and the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, Public Law 116-136, enacted on March 27, Start Printed Page 521372020, to expand Covered Countermeasures under the PREP Act. On January 31, 2020, the Secretary declared a public health emergency pursuant to section 319 of the PHS Act, 42 U.S.C. 247d, effective January 27, 2020, for the entire United States to aid in the response of the nation's health care community to the COVID-19 outbreak. Pursuant to section 319 of the PHS Act, the Secretary renewed that declaration on April 26, 2020, and July 25, 2020.

On March 10, 2020, the Secretary issued a Declaration under the PREP Act for medical countermeasures against COVID-19 (85 FR 15198, Mar. 17, 2020) (the Declaration). On April 10, the Secretary amended the Declaration under the PREP Act to extend liability immunity to covered countermeasures authorized under the CARES Act (85 FR 21012, Apr. 15, 2020).

On June 4, the Secretary amended the Declaration to clarify that covered countermeasures under the Declaration include qualified countermeasures that limit the harm COVID-19 might otherwise cause. The Secretary now amends section V of the Declaration to identify as qualified persons covered under the PREP Act, and thus authorizes, certain State-licensed pharmacists to order and administer, and pharmacy interns (who are licensed or registered by their State board of pharmacy and acting under the supervision of a State-licensed pharmacist) to administer, any vaccine that the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends to persons ages three through 18 according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule (ACIP-recommended vaccines).[] The Secretary also amends section VIII of the Declaration to clarify that the category of disease, health condition, or threat for which he recommends the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures includes not only COVID-19 caused by SARS-CoV-2 or a virus mutating therefrom, but also other diseases, health conditions, or threats that may have been caused by COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, or a virus mutating therefrom, including the decrease in the rate of childhood immunizations, which will lead to an increase in the rate of infectious diseases. Description of This Amendment by Section Section V. Covered Persons Under the PREP Act and the Declaration, a “qualified person” is a “covered person.” Subject to certain limitations, a covered person is immune from suit and liability under Federal and State law with respect to all claims for loss caused by, arising out of, relating to, or resulting from the administration or use of a covered countermeasure if a declaration under subsection (b) has been issued with respect to such countermeasure.

€œQualified person” includes (A) a licensed health professional or other individual who is authorized to prescribe, administer, or dispense such countermeasures under the law of the State in which the countermeasure was prescribed, administered, or dispensed. Or (B) “a person within a category of persons so identified in a declaration by the Secretary” under subsection (b) of the PREP Act. 42 U.S.C. 247d-6d(i)(8).[] By this amendment to the Declaration, the Secretary identifies an additional category of persons who are qualified persons under section 247d-6d(i)(8)(B).[] On May 8, 2020, CDC reported, “The identified declines in routine pediatric vaccine ordering and doses administered might indicate that U.S.

Children and their communities face increased risks for outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases,” and suggested that a decrease in rates of routine childhood vaccinations were due to changes in healthcare access, social distancing, and other COVID-19 mitigation strategies.[] The report also stated that “[p]arental concerns about potentially exposing their children to COVID-19 during well child visits might contribute to the declines observed.” [] On July 10, 2020, CDC reported its findings of a May survey it conducted to assess the capacity of pediatric health care practices to provide immunization services to children during the COVID-19 pandemic. The survey, which was limited to practices participating in the Vaccines for Children program, found that, as of mid-May, 15 percent of Northeast pediatric practices were closed, 12.5 percent of Midwest practices were closed, 6.2 percent of practices in the South were closed, and 10 percent of practices in the West were closed. Most practices had reduced office hours for in-person visits. When asked whether their practices would likely be able to accommodate new patients for immunization services through August, 418 practices (21.3 percent) either responded that this was not likely or the practice was permanently closed or not resuming immunization services for all patients, and 380 (19.6 percent) responded that they were unsure.

Urban practices and those in the Northeast were less likely to be able to accommodate new patients compared with rural practices and those in the South, Midwest, or West.[] In response to these troubling developments, CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics have stressed, “Well-child visits and vaccinations are essential services and help make sure children are protected.” [] The Secretary re-emphasizes that important recommendation to parents and legal guardians here. If your child is due for a well-child visit, contact your pediatrician's or other primary-care provider's office and ask about ways that the office safely offers well-child visits and vaccinations. Many medical offices are taking extra steps to make sure that well-child visits can occur safely during the COVID-19 pandemic, including. Scheduling sick visits and well-child visits during different times of the Start Printed Page 52138day or days of the week, or at different locations.

Asking patients to remain outside until it is time for their appointments to reduce the number of people in waiting rooms. Adhering to recommended social (physical) distancing and other infection-control practices, such as the use of masks. The decrease in childhood-vaccination rates is a public health threat and a collateral harm caused by COVID-19. Together, the United States must turn to available medical professionals to limit the harm and public health threats that may result from decreased immunization rates.

We must quickly do so to avoid preventable infections in children, additional strains on our healthcare system, and any further increase in avoidable adverse health consequences—particularly if such complications coincide with additional resurgence of COVID-19. Together with pediatricians and other healthcare professionals, pharmacists are positioned to expand access to childhood vaccinations. Many States already allow pharmacists to administer vaccines to children of any age.[] Other States permit pharmacists to administer vaccines to children depending on the age—for example, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, or 12 years of age and older.[] Few States restrict pharmacist-administered vaccinations to only adults.[] Many States also allow properly trained individuals under the supervision of a trained pharmacist to administer those vaccines.[] Pharmacists are well positioned to increase access to vaccinations, particularly in certain areas or for certain populations that have too few pediatricians and other primary-care providers, or that are otherwise medically underserved.[] As of 2018, nearly 90 percent of Americans lived within five miles of a community pharmacy.[] Pharmacies often offer extended hours and added convenience. What is more, pharmacists are trusted healthcare professionals with established relationships with their patients.

Pharmacists also have strong relationships with local medical providers and hospitals to refer patients as appropriate. For example, pharmacists already play a significant role in annual influenza vaccination. In the early 2018-19 season, they administered the influenza vaccine to nearly a third of all adults who received the vaccine.[] Given the potential danger of serious influenza and continuing COVID-19 outbreaks this autumn and the impact that such concurrent outbreaks may have on our population, our healthcare system, and our whole-of-nation response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we must quickly expand access to influenza vaccinations. Allowing more qualified pharmacists to administer the influenza vaccine to children will make vaccinations more accessible.

Therefore, the Secretary amends the Declaration to identify State-licensed pharmacists (and pharmacy interns acting under their supervision if the pharmacy intern is licensed or registered by his or her State board of pharmacy) as qualified persons under section 247d-6d(i)(8)(B) when the pharmacist orders and either the pharmacist or the supervised pharmacy intern administers vaccines to individuals ages three through 18 pursuant to the following requirements. The vaccine must be FDA-authorized or FDA-approved. The vaccination must be ordered and administered according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule.[] The licensed pharmacist must complete a practical training program of at least 20 hours that is approved by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE). This training Start Printed Page 52139program must include hands-on injection technique, clinical evaluation of indications and contraindications of vaccines, and the recognition and treatment of emergency reactions to vaccines.[] The licensed or registered pharmacy intern must complete a practical training program that is approved by the ACPE.

This training program must include hands-on injection technique, clinical evaluation of indications and contraindications of vaccines, and the recognition and treatment of emergency reactions to vaccines.[] The licensed pharmacist and licensed or registered pharmacy intern must have a current certificate in basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation.[] The licensed pharmacist must complete a minimum of two hours of ACPE-approved, immunization-related continuing pharmacy education during each State licensing period.[] The licensed pharmacist must comply with recordkeeping and reporting requirements of the jurisdiction in which he or she administers vaccines, including informing the patient's primary-care provider when available, submitting the required immunization information to the State or local immunization information system (vaccine registry), complying with requirements with respect to reporting adverse events, and complying with requirements whereby the person administering a vaccine must review the vaccine registry or other vaccination records prior to administering a vaccine.[] The licensed pharmacist must inform his or her childhood-vaccination patients and the adult caregivers accompanying the children of the importance of a well-child visit with a pediatrician or other licensed primary-care provider and refer patients as appropriate.[] These requirements are consistent with those in many States that permit licensed pharmacists to order and administer vaccines to children and permit licensed or registered pharmacy interns acting under their supervision to administer vaccines to children.[] Administering vaccinations to children age three and older is less complicated and requires less training and resources than administering vaccinations to younger children. That is because ACIP generally recommends administering intramuscular injections in the deltoid muscle for individuals age three and older.[] For individuals less than three years of age, ACIP generally recommends administering intramuscular injections in the anterolateral aspect of the thigh muscle.[] Administering injections in the thigh muscle often presents additional complexities and requires additional training and resources including additional personnel to safely position the child while another healthcare professional injects the vaccine.[] Moreover, as of 2018, 40% of three-year-olds were enrolled in preprimary programs (i.e. Preschool or kindergarten programs).[] Preprimary programs are beginning in the coming weeks or months, so the Secretary has concluded that it is particularly important for individuals ages three through 18 to receive ACIP-recommended vaccines according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule. All States require children to be vaccinated against certain communicable diseases as a condition of school attendance.

These laws often apply to both public and private schools with identical immunization and exemption provisions.[] As nurseries, preschools, kindergartens, and schools reopen, increased access to childhood vaccinations is essential to ensuring children can return. Notwithstanding any State or local scope-of-practice legal requirements, (1) qualified licensed pharmacists are identified as qualified persons to order and administer ACIP-recommended vaccines and (2) qualified State-licensed or registered pharmacy interns are identified as qualified persons to administer the ACIP-recommended vaccines ordered by their supervising qualified licensed pharmacist.[] Both the PREP Act and the June 4, 2020 Second Amendment to the Declaration define “covered countermeasures” to include qualified pandemic and epidemic products that “limit the harm such pandemic or epidemic might otherwise cause.” [] The troubling decrease in ACIP-recommended childhood vaccinations and the resulting increased risk of associated diseases, adverse health conditions, and other threats are categories of harms otherwise caused by Start Printed Page 52140COVID-19 as set forth in Sections VI and VIII of this Declaration.[] Hence, such vaccinations are “covered countermeasures” under the PREP Act and the June 4, 2020 Second Amendment to the Declaration. Nothing in this Declaration shall be construed to affect the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, including an injured party's ability to obtain compensation under that program. Covered countermeasures that are subject to the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program authorized under 42 U.S.C.

300aa-10 et seq. Are covered under this Declaration for the purposes of liability immunity and injury compensation only to the extent that injury compensation is not provided under that Program. All other terms and conditions of the Declaration apply to such covered countermeasures. Section VIII.

Category of Disease, Health Condition, or Threat As discussed, the troubling decrease in ACIP-recommended childhood vaccinations and the resulting increased risk of associated diseases, adverse health conditions, and other threats are categories of harms otherwise caused by COVID-19. The Secretary therefore amends section VIII, which describes the category of disease, health condition, or threat for which he recommends the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures, to clarify that the category of disease, health condition, or threat for which he recommends the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures is not only COVID-19 caused by SARS-CoV-2 or a virus mutating therefrom, but also other diseases, health conditions, or threats that may have been caused by COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, or a virus mutating therefrom, including the decrease in the rate of childhood immunizations, which will lead to an increase in the rate of infectious diseases. Amendments to Declaration Amended Declaration for Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act Coverage for medical countermeasures against COVID-19. Sections V and VIII of the March 10, 2020 Declaration under the PREP Act for medical countermeasures against COVID-19, as amended April 10, 2020 and June 4, 2020, are further amended pursuant to section 319F-3(b)(4) of the PHS Act as described below.

All other sections of the Declaration remain in effect as published at 85 FR 15198 (Mar. 17, 2020) and amended at 85 FR 21012 (Apr. 15, 2020) and 85 FR 35100 (June 8, 2020). 1.

Covered Persons, section V, delete in full and replace with. V. Covered Persons 42 U.S.C. 247d-6d(i)(2), (3), (4), (6), (8)(A) and (B) Covered Persons who are afforded liability immunity under this Declaration are “manufacturers,” “distributors,” “program planners,” “qualified persons,” and their officials, agents, and employees, as those terms are defined in the PREP Act, and the United States.

In addition, I have determined that the following additional persons are qualified persons. (a) Any person authorized in accordance with the public health and medical emergency response of the Authority Having Jurisdiction, as described in Section VII below, to prescribe, administer, deliver, distribute or dispense the Covered Countermeasures, and their officials, agents, employees, contractors and volunteers, following a Declaration of an emergency. (b) any person authorized to prescribe, administer, or dispense the Covered Countermeasures or who is otherwise authorized to perform an activity under an Emergency Use Authorization in accordance with Section 564 of the FD&C Act. (c) any person authorized to prescribe, administer, or dispense Covered Countermeasures in accordance with Section 564A of the FD&C Act.

And (d) a State-licensed pharmacist who orders and administers, and pharmacy interns who administer (if the pharmacy intern acts under the supervision of such pharmacist and the pharmacy intern is licensed or registered by his or her State board of pharmacy), vaccines that the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends to persons ages three through 18 according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule. Such State-licensed pharmacists and the State-licensed or registered interns under their supervision are qualified persons only if the following requirements are met. The vaccine must be FDA-authorized or FDA-approved. The vaccination must be ordered and administered according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule.

The licensed pharmacist must complete a practical training program of at least 20 hours that is approved by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE). This training program must include hands-on injection technique, clinical evaluation of indications and contraindications of vaccines, and the recognition and treatment of emergency reactions to vaccines. The licensed or registered pharmacy intern must complete a practical training program that is approved by the ACPE. This training program must include hands-on injection technique, clinical evaluation of indications and contraindications of vaccines, and the recognition and treatment of emergency reactions to vaccines.

The licensed pharmacist and licensed or registered pharmacy intern must have a current certificate in basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The licensed pharmacist must complete a minimum of two hours of ACPE-approved, immunization-related continuing pharmacy education during each State licensing period. The licensed pharmacist must comply with recordkeeping and reporting requirements of the jurisdiction in which he or she administers vaccines, including informing the patient's primary-care provider when available, submitting the required immunization information to the State or local immunization information system (vaccine registry), complying with requirements with respect to reporting adverse events, and complying with requirements whereby the person administering a vaccine must review the vaccine registry or other vaccination records prior to administering a vaccine. The licensed pharmacist must inform his or her childhood-vaccination patients and the adult caregiver accompanying the child of the importance of a well-child visit with a pediatrician or other licensed primary-care provider and refer patients as appropriate.

Nothing in this Declaration shall be construed to affect the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, including an injured party's ability to obtain compensation under that program. Covered countermeasures that are subject to the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program authorized under 42 U.S.C. 300aa-10 et seq. Are covered under this Declaration for the purposes of liability immunity and injury compensation only to the extent that injury compensation is not provided under that Program.

All other Start Printed Page 52141terms and conditions of the Declaration apply to such covered countermeasures. 2. Category of Disease, Health Condition, or Threat, section VIII, delete in full and replace with. VIII.

Category of Disease, Health Condition, or Threat 42 U.S.C. 247d-6d(b)(2)(A) The category of disease, health condition, or threat for which I recommend the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures is not only COVID-19 caused by SARS-CoV-2 or a virus mutating therefrom, but also other diseases, health conditions, or threats that may have been caused by COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, or a virus mutating therefrom, including the decrease in the rate of childhood immunizations, which will lead to an increase in the rate of infectious diseases. Start Authority 42 U.S.C. 247d-6d.

End Authority Start Signature Dated. August 19, 2020. Alex M. Azar II, Secretary of Health and Human Services.

End Signature End Supplemental Information [FR Doc. 2020-18542 Filed 8-20-20. 4:15 pm]BILLING CODE 4150-03-P.

Can dogs have singulair for allergies

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Latest Sleep News By Dennis ThompsonHealthDay is singulair free at publix ReporterTHURSDAY, Aug. 27, 2020A frequent need to nap could be a red flag for future heart problems and is singulair free at publix a higher risk of early death, a new analysis concludes.Long naps lasting more than an hour are associated with a 34% elevated risk of heart disease and a 30% greater risk of death, according to the combined results of 20 previous studies.Overall, naps of any length were associated with a 19% increased risk of premature death, a Chinese research team found. The study results were released Wednesday for presentation at the virtual annual meeting of the European Society of Cardiology."If you want to take a siesta, our study indicates it's safest to keep it under an hour," lead researcher Zhe Pan of Guangzhou Medical University said in a society news release. "For those of us not in the habit of a daytime slumber, there is no convincing evidence to start."For their study, the researchers analyzed data from 20 studies involving more than is singulair free at publix 313,000 participants.

About two in five people in the studies said they nap.The investigators found that the connection was more pronounced in people aged 65 and older. These older folks had a 27% higher risk of death associated with napping and a 36% greater is singulair free at publix risk of heart disease. Women also had a stronger association between napping and poor health, with a 22% greater risk of death and a 31% greater risk of is singulair free at publix heart problems.Interestingly, long naps were linked with an increased risk of death in people who sleep more than six hours a night. That would seem to rule out poor sleep as an explanation for the increased risk of death and heart health issues.Adults who get less than seven hours of sleep each night are more likely to say they've had a heart attack, according to the U.S.

Centers for is singulair free at publix Disease Control and Prevention. Poor sleep also has been linked to high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and obesity, all of which increase the risk of heart disease, heart attack and stroke.Pan speculated that long naps might affect the body because they are associated with higher levels of inflammation.But heart health experts said that just because you're sleeping through the night doesn't mean you've gotten a good night's sleep -- something for which this study doesn't account.Regarding how well you're resting at night, napping "might be a sign that there's something else going on," said Dr. Nieca Goldberg, a cardiologist and director of the is singulair free at publix NYU Langone Center for Women's Health, in New York City."What kind of sleep were these individuals getting?. " Goldberg said of is singulair free at publix the study participants.

"Were they waking up at night?. Did they have sleep apnea? is singulair free at publix. "Dr. Matthew Tomey, a cardiologist with Mount Sinai Morningside in New York City, agreed that these folks might be suffering from poor sleep."Some people take naps as is singulair free at publix a matter of habit, or they take a power nap," Tomey said.

"For others, they're taking potentially longer naps during the daytime because of too little or too poor quality sleep at night."People should take a nap when they feel like it, but if they regularly need naps that could be a sign of trouble, Tomey said."If they notice that they feel excessively sleepy during the daytime, needing multiple or long naps, that's a wake-up call to pay attention to the quality and quantity of their nighttime sleep," he added.People who frequently nap should talk with their doctor about their sleep issues, since they might be suffering from sleep apnea or some other issue that disrupts quality sleep, Tomey and Goldberg said.Good sleep habits, according to the CDC, include:Sticking to a regular sleep schedule.Getting enough natural light during the day, to positively influence brain chemicals related to sleep.Exercising regularly, but not within a few hours of bedtime.Avoiding artificial light near bedtime.Keeping your bedroom cool, dark and quiet.Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights is singulair free at publix reserved. SLIDESHOW Sleep Disorders is singulair free at publix. Foods That Help Sleep or Keep You Awake See Slideshow References SOURCES.

Nieca Goldberg, MD, cardiologist and director, NYU Langone Center for Women's Health, New York City is singulair free at publix. Matthew Tomey, MD, cardiologist, Mount Sinai Morningside, New York City. European Society of Cardiology, annual meeting.Latest Heart News By is singulair free at publix Serena McNiffHealthDay ReporterWEDNESDAY, Aug. 26, 2020 (HealthDay News)Most strokes strike when an artery in the brain suddenly becomes blocked, but new research shows a rarer cause of strokes is becoming more common.It's called cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), and it happens when a vein in the brain is clogged.

While CVT is estimated to is singulair free at publix cause less than 1% of all strokes, scientists discovered it is now more prevalent and affecting a different demographic than previously thought.Study author Dr. Fadar Otite and his colleagues pored over years of hospital records from New York and Florida to find out how many cases of CVT occurred in these states between 2006 is singulair free at publix and 2016. Otite is an assistant professor of neurology at SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, N.Y.Based on the data they analyzed, the researchers estimated that the number of CVT cases in the United States rose from around 14 cases per million in 2006 to 20 cases per million in 2014."We still find that the incidence of CVT is less than 1% of all strokes, even across our study period, but the incidence increased by 70% over time," Otite said. "In 2006, the proportion of all strokes that were CVT was 0.47% is singulair free at publix.

At the end of our study, which was in 2016, that proportion increased to 0.80%."CVT causes blood clots to form in the veins of the brain. These veins drain is singulair free at publix blood that has already been used by brain cells, sending it back to the heart to be replenished with oxygen. If a clot forms in one of these veins, it may leak into the surrounding brain tissue and could cause a stroke, the researchers explained.While CVT is still most common in young women -- about two-thirds of all CVT hospitalizations included in the study is singulair free at publix were in females -- the researchers found that the number of cases among this demographic did not increase over the 10-year study period. Instead, they saw increases in CVT among men and older women."Part of the message is that we agree that CVT is still more common in women, but because of the diverse clinical presentation of CVT, when other symptoms that may be attributable to CVT are present in other demographics, we should take them with more seriousness," Otite said.Another major finding was that CVT incidence in Black people was significantly higher than in other races.

But why that is the case is singulair free at publix remains unknown. "We have no clear explanation, because this is truly the first study to ever relate the incidence of CVT between races," he added.Several factors may put one at a higher risk of developing CVT, including pregnancy and taking hormonal birth control pills, which may be why it is more common in younger women, the researchers noted.And many of the risk factors for CVT -- like blood clotting disorders or medications that cause clotting, severe dehydration, infections of the ear, face or neck, head trauma, obesity and cancer -- are somewhat different from the triggers typically associated with stroke.It is important for clinicians to be aware of this rise in CVT incidence because the condition can easily be confused as something else, Otite said. Patients with CVT may have unspecific complaints such as headaches, blurry vision or seizures.Around 3% of patients in a prior study who had CVT and went to the hospital were diagnosed with something else and sent is singulair free at publix home, according to Otite. "So, it's important to recognize this from the start, because by the next time the clinical condition may be worse," he said.CVT can be treated with medication to thin the blood and help prevent further clotting, which may not be prescribed if the condition isn't properly diagnosed, he added.Dr.

Jose Biller, chair of the neurology department at Loyola University Medical Center in Hines, Ill., said the takeaway from this study is that more attention should be paid is singulair free at publix to CVT."I think that there should be an increased awareness of cerebral venous thrombosis because, by and large, when people think about stroke, they don't think about it," Biller said. "There should be is singulair free at publix an increasing level of awareness because this is a condition that has a specific treatment."The study was published online Aug. 26 in the journal Neurology.Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights is singulair free at publix reserved.

SLIDESHOW Stroke Causes, Symptoms, and Recovery See Slideshow References SOURCES. Fadar Oliver Otite, MD, assistant professor, neurology, State University of New York (SUNY) is singulair free at publix Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, N.Y.. Jose Biller, MD, chair, department of neurology, is singulair free at publix Loyola University Medical Center, Hines, Ill.. Neurology, Aug.

26, 2020, onlineLatest Hearing is singulair free at publix News WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26, 2020 (HealthDay News)Even if they appear unresponsive, dying people may still be able to hear.That's the takeaway from a Canadian analysis of hospice patients in Vancouver.Researchers compared electroencephalography (EEG) data -- a measure of electrical activity in the brain -- collected when patients were conscious and when they became unresponsive at the end of life. Those patients were compared to a healthy control group.The study looked at brain response to various patterns of common and rare sounds that changed frequency, and found that responses of some of the dying patients were similar to those of healthy people -- even hours before death."In the last hours before an expected natural death, many people enter a period of unresponsiveness," said lead author Elizabeth Blundon, a doctoral student in psychology at the University of British Columbia at the time of the study."Our data shows that a dying brain can respond to sound, even in an unconscious state, up to the last hours of life," she said in a university news release.Co-author Lawrence Ward, a professor of psychology, said researchers were able to identify specific mental processes in both groups of participants."We had to look very carefully at the individual control participants' data, to see if each one of them showed a particular type of brain response before we felt confident that the unresponsive patient's brain reacted similarly," he said in the release.The findings were recently published in the journal Scientific Reports."This research gives credence to the fact that hospice nurses and physicians noticed that the sounds of loved ones helped comfort people when they were dying," said is singulair free at publix study co-author Dr. Romayne Gallagher, a now-retired palliative care physician at St.

John Hospice in Vancouver."And to me, it adds significant meaning to the last days and hours of life and shows that being present, in person or by phone, is singulair free at publix is meaningful," she said. "It is is singulair free at publix a comfort to be able to say goodbye and express love."While the evidence of brain activity supports the idea that dying people might hear, it's not known if they're aware of what they're hearing, Blundon noted."Their brains responded to the auditory stimuli, but we can't possibly know if they're remembering, identifying voices, or understanding language," she said. "There are all these other questions that have yet to be answered. This first glimpse supports the idea that we have to keep talking to people when they is singulair free at publix are dying because something is happening in their brain."-- Robert PreidtCopyright © 2020 HealthDay.

All rights reserved. QUESTION What is hearing is singulair free at publix loss?. See Answer is singulair free at publix References SOURCE. University of British Columbia, news release, July 8, 2020Latest Pregnancy News THURSDAY, Aug.

27, 2020 is singulair free at publix (HealthDay News)A new case study adds to growing evidence that the new coronavirus can be transmitted from a pregnant woman to her fetus."It's very important to bring to the forefront this finding that mothers and infants can be affected by COVID-19, transmission can occur during pregnancy, and pregnant mothers need to protect themselves," said Dr. Amanda Evans, senior author of the report."We don't know whether there are any long-term effects of COVID-19 infection in babies," she added. Evans is an assistant professor of pediatrics specializing in infectious diseases at UT Southwestern is singulair free at publix (UTSW) Medical Center in Dallas.The case involved a woman who was 34 weeks pregnant. She visited the emergency department at Parkland Memorial Hospital in Dallas with signs of premature labor and was admitted when she tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.Though the patient didn't have the typical respiratory symptoms associated with COVID-19, she did have a fever and diarrhea, suggesting possible viral infection.

Before going to the hospital, she didn't know she had the coronavirus.After a few days in the hospital, the woman gave birth in early May to a 7-pound, 3-ounce girl who initially appeared is singulair free at publix healthy. After 24 hours, is singulair free at publix however, the baby developed a fever and signs of respiratory distress, including an abnormally high breathing rate and lower blood-oxygen levels. Tests showed that she had COVID-19.Study first author Dr. Julide Sisman, an associate professor of pediatrics who cared for the newborn, said, "At that time, the knowledge we had was that transmission doesn't occur is singulair free at publix in utero, so we really weren't expecting that at all."Further investigation showed the baby was infected while in the womb.

Both mother and baby fully recovered, according to the case study published online recently in The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal.More than 20 million people worldwide have been infected with the new coronavirus, but data on how it affects pregnant women have been limited, the authors noted in a UTSW news release."The fact that this can occur, even if rare, illustrates how important it is to limit exposure for mothers and newborns," said Dr. Wilmer Moreno, an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at UTSW. "Anything, like telemedicine visits, that can eliminate the need for mom to be around other people will be very helpful."-- Robert PreidtCopyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

SLIDESHOW Conception. The Amazing Journey from Egg to Embryo See Slideshow References SOURCE. UT Southwestern Medical Center, news release, Aug. 24, 2020.

Latest Sleep News By Dennis ThompsonHealthDay ReporterTHURSDAY, Aug singulair online purchase. 27, 2020A frequent need to nap could be a red flag for future heart problems and a higher risk of early death, a new analysis concludes.Long naps lasting more than an hour are associated with a 34% elevated risk of heart disease and a 30% greater risk of death, according to the combined results of 20 previous studies.Overall, naps of any length were associated with a 19% increased risk of premature death, a Chinese research team singulair online purchase found. The study results were released Wednesday for presentation at the virtual annual meeting of the European Society of Cardiology."If you want to take a siesta, our study indicates it's safest to keep it under an hour," lead researcher Zhe Pan of Guangzhou Medical University said in a society news release. "For those of us not in the habit of a daytime slumber, there is no convincing evidence to start."For their study, the researchers analyzed data from 20 singulair online purchase studies involving more than 313,000 participants.

About two in five people in the studies said they nap.The investigators found that the connection was more pronounced in people aged 65 and older. These older folks had a 27% singulair online purchase higher risk of death associated with napping and a 36% greater risk of heart disease. Women also had a stronger association between napping and poor health, with a singulair online purchase 22% greater risk of death and a 31% greater risk of heart problems.Interestingly, long naps were linked with an increased risk of death in people who sleep more than six hours a night. That would seem to rule out poor sleep as an explanation for the increased risk of death and heart health issues.Adults who get less than seven hours of sleep each night are more likely to say they've had a heart attack, according to the U.S.

Centers for Disease Control singulair online purchase and Prevention. Poor sleep also has been linked to high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and obesity, all of which increase the risk of heart disease, heart attack and stroke.Pan speculated that long naps might affect the body because they are associated with higher levels of inflammation.But heart health experts said that just because you're sleeping through the night doesn't mean you've gotten a good night's sleep -- something for which this study doesn't account.Regarding how well you're resting at night, napping "might be a sign that there's something else going on," said Dr. Nieca Goldberg, a cardiologist singulair online purchase and director of the NYU Langone Center for Women's Health, in New York City."What kind of sleep were these individuals getting?. " Goldberg singulair online purchase said of the study participants.

"Were they waking up at night?. Did they have singulair online purchase sleep apnea?. "Dr. Matthew Tomey, a cardiologist with singulair online purchase Mount Sinai Morningside in New York City, agreed that these folks might be suffering from poor sleep."Some people take naps as a matter of habit, or they take a power nap," Tomey said.

"For others, they're taking potentially longer naps during the daytime because of too little or too poor quality sleep at night."People should take a nap when they feel like it, but if they regularly need naps that could be a sign of trouble, Tomey said."If they notice that they feel excessively sleepy during the daytime, needing multiple or long naps, that's a wake-up call to pay attention to the quality and quantity of their nighttime sleep," he added.People who frequently nap should talk with their doctor about their sleep issues, since they might be suffering from sleep apnea or some other issue that disrupts quality sleep, Tomey and Goldberg said.Good sleep habits, according to the CDC, include:Sticking to a regular sleep schedule.Getting enough natural light during the day, to positively influence brain chemicals related to sleep.Exercising regularly, but not within a few hours of bedtime.Avoiding artificial light near bedtime.Keeping your bedroom cool, dark and quiet.Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights singulair online purchase reserved. SLIDESHOW singulair online purchase Sleep Disorders. Foods That Help Sleep or Keep You Awake See Slideshow References SOURCES.

Nieca Goldberg, MD, cardiologist and director, NYU Langone Center for Women's Health, New singulair online purchase York City. Matthew Tomey, MD, cardiologist, Mount Sinai Morningside, New York City. European Society of Cardiology, annual singulair online purchase meeting.Latest Heart News By Serena McNiffHealthDay ReporterWEDNESDAY, Aug. 26, 2020 (HealthDay News)Most strokes strike when an artery in the brain suddenly becomes blocked, but new research shows a rarer cause of strokes is becoming more common.It's called cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), and it happens when a vein in the brain is clogged.

While CVT is estimated to cause less than 1% of all strokes, scientists discovered it is now singulair online purchase more prevalent and affecting a different demographic than previously thought.Study author Dr. Fadar Otite and his colleagues pored over years singulair online purchase of hospital records from New York and Florida to find out how many cases of CVT occurred in these states between 2006 and 2016. Otite is an assistant professor of neurology at SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, N.Y.Based on the data they analyzed, the researchers estimated that the number of CVT cases in the United States rose from around 14 cases per million in 2006 to 20 cases per million in 2014."We still find that the incidence of CVT is less than 1% of all strokes, even across our study period, but the incidence increased by 70% over time," Otite said. "In 2006, the singulair online purchase proportion of all strokes that were CVT was 0.47%.

At the end of our study, which was in 2016, that proportion increased to 0.80%."CVT causes blood clots to form in the veins of the brain. These veins drain blood that has already been used by brain cells, sending singulair online purchase it back to the heart to be replenished with oxygen. If a clot forms singulair online purchase in one of these veins, it may leak into the surrounding brain tissue and could cause a stroke, the researchers explained.While CVT is still most common in young women -- about two-thirds of all CVT hospitalizations included in the study were in females -- the researchers found that the number of cases among this demographic did not increase over the 10-year study period. Instead, they saw increases in CVT among men and older women."Part of the message is that we agree that CVT is still more common in women, but because of the diverse clinical presentation of CVT, when other symptoms that may be attributable to CVT are present in other demographics, we should take them with more seriousness," Otite said.Another major finding was that CVT incidence in Black people was significantly higher than in other races.

But why that is the case remains singulair online purchase unknown. "We have no clear explanation, because this is truly the first study to ever relate the incidence of CVT between races," he added.Several factors may put one at a higher risk of developing CVT, including pregnancy and taking hormonal birth control pills, which may be why it is more common in younger women, the researchers noted.And many of the risk factors for CVT -- like blood clotting disorders or medications that cause clotting, severe dehydration, infections of the ear, face or neck, head trauma, obesity and cancer -- are somewhat different from the triggers typically associated with stroke.It is important for clinicians to be aware of this rise in CVT incidence because the condition can easily be confused as something else, Otite said. Patients with CVT singulair online purchase may have unspecific complaints such as headaches, blurry vision or seizures.Around 3% of patients in a prior study who had CVT and went to the hospital were diagnosed with something else and sent home, according to Otite. "So, it's important to recognize this from the start, because by the next time the clinical condition may be worse," he said.CVT can be treated with medication to thin the blood and help prevent further clotting, which may not be prescribed if the condition isn't properly diagnosed, he added.Dr.

Jose Biller, chair of the neurology department at Loyola University Medical Center in Hines, Ill., said the takeaway from singulair online purchase this study is that more attention should be paid to CVT."I think that there should be an increased awareness of cerebral venous thrombosis because, by and large, when people think about stroke, they don't think about it," Biller said. "There should be an increasing level of awareness because this singulair online purchase is a condition that has a specific treatment."The study was published online Aug. 26 in the journal Neurology.Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights singulair online purchase reserved.

SLIDESHOW Stroke Causes, Symptoms, and Recovery See Slideshow References SOURCES. Fadar Oliver Otite, MD, assistant professor, neurology, State University of New singulair online purchase York (SUNY) Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, N.Y.. Jose Biller, MD, chair, department of neurology, Loyola singulair online purchase University Medical Center, Hines, Ill.. Neurology, Aug.

26, 2020, onlineLatest Hearing News singulair online purchase WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26, 2020 (HealthDay News)Even if they appear unresponsive, dying people may still be able to hear.That's the takeaway from a Canadian analysis of hospice patients in Vancouver.Researchers compared electroencephalography (EEG) data -- a measure of electrical activity in the brain -- collected when patients were conscious and when they became unresponsive at the end of life. Those patients were compared to a healthy control group.The study looked at brain response to various patterns of common and rare sounds that changed frequency, and found that responses of some of the dying patients were similar to those of healthy people -- even hours before death."In singulair online purchase the last hours before an expected natural death, many people enter a period of unresponsiveness," said lead author Elizabeth Blundon, a doctoral student in psychology at the University of British Columbia at the time of the study."Our data shows that a dying brain can respond to sound, even in an unconscious state, up to the last hours of life," she said in a university news release.Co-author Lawrence Ward, a professor of psychology, said researchers were able to identify specific mental processes in both groups of participants."We had to look very carefully at the individual control participants' data, to see if each one of them showed a particular type of brain response before we felt confident that the unresponsive patient's brain reacted similarly," he said in the release.The findings were recently published in the journal Scientific Reports."This research gives credence to the fact that hospice nurses and physicians noticed that the sounds of loved ones helped comfort people when they were dying," said study co-author Dr. Romayne Gallagher, a now-retired palliative care physician at St.

John Hospice in Vancouver."And to me, it adds significant meaning to the last days and hours of life and shows that being singulair online purchase present, in person or by phone, is meaningful," she said. "It is a comfort to be able to say goodbye and express singulair online purchase love."While the evidence of brain activity supports the idea that dying people might hear, it's not known if they're aware of what they're hearing, Blundon noted."Their brains responded to the auditory stimuli, but we can't possibly know if they're remembering, identifying voices, or understanding language," she said. "There are all these other questions that have yet to be answered. This first glimpse supports the idea that we have to keep talking to people when they are dying because something is happening in their brain."-- singulair online purchase Robert PreidtCopyright © 2020 HealthDay.

All rights reserved. QUESTION What is hearing loss? singulair online purchase. See Answer singulair online purchase References SOURCE. University of British Columbia, news release, July 8, 2020Latest Pregnancy News THURSDAY, Aug.

27, 2020 (HealthDay News)A new case study adds to growing evidence that the new coronavirus can be transmitted from a pregnant woman to her fetus."It's very important to singulair online purchase bring to the forefront this finding that mothers and infants can be affected by COVID-19, transmission can occur during pregnancy, and pregnant mothers need to protect themselves," said Dr. Amanda Evans, senior author of the report."We don't know whether there are any long-term effects of COVID-19 infection in babies," she added. Evans is an assistant professor of pediatrics specializing in infectious diseases at UT Southwestern (UTSW) singulair online purchase Medical Center in Dallas.The case involved a woman who was 34 weeks pregnant. She visited the emergency department at Parkland Memorial Hospital in Dallas with signs of premature labor and was admitted when she tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.Though the patient didn't have the typical respiratory symptoms associated with COVID-19, she did have a fever and diarrhea, suggesting possible viral infection.

Before going to the hospital, she didn't know she had the coronavirus.After a few days in singulair online purchase the hospital, the woman gave birth in early May to a 7-pound, 3-ounce girl who initially appeared healthy. After 24 hours, however, the baby developed a fever and signs of respiratory distress, including an abnormally high singulair online purchase breathing rate and lower blood-oxygen levels. Tests showed that she had COVID-19.Study first author Dr. Julide Sisman, an associate professor of pediatrics who cared for the newborn, said, "At that time, the knowledge singulair online purchase we had was that transmission doesn't occur in utero, so we really weren't expecting that at all."Further investigation showed the baby was infected while in the womb.

Both mother and baby fully recovered, according to the case study published online recently in The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal.More than 20 million people worldwide have been infected with the new coronavirus, but data on how it affects pregnant women have been limited, the authors noted in a UTSW news release."The fact that this can occur, even if rare, illustrates how important it is to limit exposure for mothers and newborns," said Dr. Wilmer Moreno, an assistant professor of singulair online purchase obstetrics and gynecology at UTSW. "Anything, like telemedicine visits, that can eliminate singulair online purchase the need for mom to be around other people will be very helpful."-- Robert PreidtCopyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

SLIDESHOW singulair online purchase Conception. The Amazing Journey from Egg to Embryo See Slideshow References SOURCE. UT Southwestern Medical Center, news release, Aug. 24, 2020.

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